chicken attacking me

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by edwarra, Jan 18, 2017.

  1. edwarra

    edwarra Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a chicken that I have had since March of 2016. She has recently started to attack me when I go into the back yard. She runs after me and pecks at my legs. I put my foot up to stop her one time and her feathers all stood up and she went a little crazy on my shoe. How do I stop this behavior? She has never been very friendly, does not let me hold or pet her, and just started eating out of my hand. She is a different breed from my orpingtons so I dont know if it a breed thing. This hen is more aggressive than my rooster.
     
  2. SunHwaKwon

    SunHwaKwon Overrun With Chickens

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    Is she perhaps running after you because she thinks you have food or treats, and then pecking at your shoes or shoelaces (pretty common).
     
  3. DwayneNLiz

    DwayneNLiz ...lost... Premium Member

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    could you be walking near a hidden nest and she is a crazy broody hen protecting her nest?
     
  4. ejcrist

    ejcrist Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It could also be that she thinks you're another hen and she's putting you in your pecking order place. I have a couple that do/have done that and I just put my hand on their back pinning them on the ground until they settle down. At that point they know you're not lower in the order than they are, most of the time anyway. Sometimes I'm busy and I just ignore them though since there's only so much damage they can do. Roosters are another matter altogether since they're packin' heat (armed with spurs).
     
  5. edwarra

    edwarra Out Of The Brooder

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    My rooster stays 2feet away from me. He dosent let me touch him buttes not aggressive. He actually visits all my neighbors lol
     
  6. edwarra

    edwarra Out Of The Brooder

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    q

    I don't think so it happens as soon as I step off of my deck. She has charged me
     
  7. edwarra

    edwarra Out Of The Brooder

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    ww


    I'll try putting her on the ground, I tried to gently kick her away but that didn't deter her. I wasn't sure if it was a pecking order thing or not I'm normally going to sit with them after I give them water food and a treat
     
  8. Shezadandy

    Shezadandy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I start with a good tap to the top of the head or the back. Depending on your speed and flexibility the back could be the easiest target. This simulates another chicken saying "hey, buzz off, I outrank you". They can take a pretty firm tap- one or two fingers, like a hen pecking a lower member of the flock.

    Obviously you don't want to go for bodily harm. However, it should (after a little practice) be something that she doesn't want to have happen again, i.e. it's not a game where she then escalates and starts jumping at you, or tries to return the peck.

    If she challenges you further-- that's when I personally go for the pin down. Keeping her pinned (and do watch her breathing- make sure you're not constricting her lungs/air sacs!!) until she stops struggling. By the end of the pin down, she should have her head down (away from you) with a surrender mentality. If you get the defiant gaze/attempt to peck you, (you'll know it if you see it), use your other hand to give her a light peck to the top of head (one finger like a beak). If she doesn't lower it then, use one or two fingers to gently push her head down, like an inch off the ground-- continue to do this until she holds her own head down and isn't trying to get up.

    The goal is for her to never consider charging, pecking or otherwise being nasty to you ever again.

    If she's a real .... piece of work ...my last step is to put them on their side/back similar to the pin down, except she doesn't have her feet under her- hold down (being very careful not to restrict breathing)
    while she struggles, probably kicking her feet etc.- wait til she stops- and stays put as you release the pressure.

    Others have noted that after some practice with both the pecking and pin-down, that they got the best results on a fresh entry (i.e. you going into your backyard for the first time of the day, or whenever she's at her worst) -- and went straight for the pin down.
     
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  9. Zoomie

    Zoomie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I pin them down too - but then I pick them up and hold them under my arm and pet them. They HATE that. Make sure to hold them low down by your waist... some will peck at your face, you don't want to give them the opportunity. I like petting them because I stay in a good frame of mind - not angry, not trying to "get revenge" or something, just pick them up and pet them for a few minutes and then put them down again in a peaceful and kind fashion. I've always had them leave me alone after that. Usually it's a rooster that does it.

    This works on geese, too. Our gander used to come up threatening me, hissing, with his head snaked along the ground. I just picked him up and petted him. I had to repeat this about 4 times, after that he never again went after me.
     
  10. Shezadandy

    Shezadandy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes- never angry, vengeful, mean or physically harmful. Mine (even the little handful that have earned a pinning) are almost all good with being held, so picking them up doesn't work in our situation. I can go chicken to chicken (20+ chickens), laying them down on their sides and clipping nails, and looking for fluffy ladies in need of a vent feather trim, and trimming them-- without any help at all.

    To earn a pinning, we're talking really unacceptable behavior. During the inevitable tantrum (squirming, squealing, kicking, growling, maybe trying to bite) I go into what I call 'teeth brushing mode'. After watching the flock school a new 'coming of age' cockerel, I noted that surrender mode involves not moving with the head down, so I strive to accomplish what is meaningful to them.



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