Chicken brains (y/n)

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by iananderson, Dec 20, 2014.

  1. iananderson

    iananderson Out Of The Brooder

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    Don't misunderstand me, I love the way that chickens can be both incredibly smart one minute and yet as dumb as a dishcloth the next, but when I moved the chooks water into it's trial winter location (over a small heater) I was amazed that the previous 7 months of knowledge disappeared in an instant!

    I only moved the blooming thing 3 feet, but no they moped about clearly not drinking anything. I had to 'teach' them what it was all over again (fortunately it only took a few taps to get them started again). The heater is a new idea to stop the water freezing and it's showing one or two degrees C at the moment, so I am doubting it will work once it gets properly cold (it's only -5 C at the mo).

    And yet the very same chickens found the only 6' section of wall on the outside of our home at ground level that has any heating on inside (at that level it's all storage or underfloor areas apart from a bathroom, living accom is 3 foot out the ground.) the wall must radiate a fraction of it's heat, although none that I could feel with my bare hands, but they congregate exactly there, smart huh?

    Chickens dontcha just love em!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    My Coop
    Go figure... Chickens can be so good at learning and following routines, but once you change up the routine, they can be at a loss for a while. Although humans can kind of respond to changes in routine that way, usually to a less extent.
     
  3. darina

    darina Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Those Jaers are beautiful! What do think of them? I would like to get some, but I have read that they do not do well in confinement, and my run would probably be too small for their liking.
     
  4. iananderson

    iananderson Out Of The Brooder

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    I love ours, they lay exactly the same sized egg as our Light Sussex and she is twice as big! I recon that makes them quite 'efficient' lol!

    They are small and dainty looking, each one different which is great for the kids/names etc. They are quite inquisitive and can fly quite well too, occasionally getting 'stuck' in the lower branches of our apple trees where they make a lot of noise before finding the 'courage' to fly down again (v amusing!).

    Not sure about the confinement, our 3 (plus the LS) only have a 4' x 10' run, (and a 4'x4'x4' coop) although most days I open the door and they have the run of the area.

    Next time we are not going to bother with the 'fancy' breeds and just get the local Jærhons. Apparently they can all be traced back to a singe pair here in Norway.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2015
  5. darina

    darina Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have read that they are very good at flying! I also saw that all the Jaerhons in the US can be traced to one or two pairs that were brought to the US around 1910.

    My husband is of Norwegian heritage, so I tried to get him interested in that breed. Alas, I am still the only "chicken nut" in the family. :)
     
  6. iananderson

    iananderson Out Of The Brooder

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    I know, I read somewhere that between about 1875 and 1920 about 1 million Norwegians emigrated to the States. An incredible number when you think that there are only 5 million Norwegians now and I imagine there would have been considerably less back in those days.

    Can you imagine say, a quarter of the population of a country emigrating? Amazing.

    Good luck working on the hubby re the Jærhons!
     

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