Chicken breeds that do well in the heat!

rkbhjk10

In the Brooder
Mar 17, 2015
71
6
41
We will be moving to south texas soon. I know the weather is very high humidity and high temperatures...especially in the summer! I have all different kinds of chicks right now but can anyone tell me what kinds do best in this environment? Or maybe even some tips I could use in building the coop to keep them cool?

I have silkies, sultans, houdans, polish, frizzles, few bantam babies, giant cochins, ameraucanas, and a few others.. I just would hate to put any of them through a rough life if I know certain breeds can't handle that weather.
 

1muttsfan

Up Northerner
10 Years
Mar 26, 2011
21,827
9,590
787
Upper Peninsula Michigan
The mediteranian breeds in general do better in hot weather. You may want to check in with people on the Texas, Az, NM and other hot state's threads - look in the Where am I - Where are You section of the Social section of the Forum. Folks in those places would likely be able to help you with coop and run suggestions.

The Henderson Chicken Chart also ranks temperature hardiness of birds -

http://www.sagehenfarmlodi.com/chooks/chooks.html
 

Michael OShay

Crowing
5 Years
May 14, 2014
25,581
2,436
438
Montana
As 1muttsfan said, Mediterranean breeds generally do well in hot weather. The downside to them is that they are typically high strung and flighty. If you prefer one of the calmer and more gentle breeds (potential lap pets), Australorps are the way to go as they are extremely hardy in both cold and heat (not surprising since they are often raised in the Australian outback where it gets very hot). I've raised them where summer temperatures frequently reached 117-118 F (sometimes more), and while my other dual purpose breeds were listless, panting, and lifting their wings, my Australorps were going about their usual business like troopers. I've also raised them where winter temperatures dropped to 30 F below zero, and with a dry, draft free, yet well ventilated coop to keep moisture from building up in the coop, they did just fine. In addition they are the best layers of the standard, brown egg laying breeds. Whatever breeds you decide to get, good luck with your flock.
 

Michael OShay

Crowing
5 Years
May 14, 2014
25,581
2,436
438
Montana
As 1muttsfan said, Mediterranean breeds generally do well in hot weather. The downside to them is that they are typically high strung and flighty. If you prefer one of the calmer and more gentle breeds (potential lap pets), Australorps are the way to go as they are extremely hardy in both cold and heat (not surprising since they are often raised in the Australian outback where it gets very hot). I've raised them where summer temperatures frequently reached 117-118 F (sometimes more), and while my other dual purpose breeds were listless, panting, and lifting their wings, my Australorps were going about their usual business like troopers. I've also raised them where winter temperatures dropped to 30 F below zero, and with a dry, draft free, yet well ventilated coop to keep moisture from building up in the coop, they did just fine. In addition they are the best layers of the standard, brown egg laying breeds. Whatever breeds you decide to get, good luck with your flock.
P.S. I was raised in east Texas where it was hot and very humid in the summer, and my Australorps did fine there as well. :eek:)
 

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