Chicken dewormer- Natural versus Store Bought

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Sdominique, May 1, 2018.

  1. Sdominique

    Sdominique Songster

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    Are there any natural dewormers out there that a person can easily get their hands on? Are they more effective than store bought? I have a flock of 15 birds that I want to treat. I don't know if they have worms or not but I want to go ahead and treat them. Git a couple of hens acting lethargic, Combs are a pale pink.
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Natural wormers are ineffective. Get you a bottle of valbazen, it'll last you a long time and you'll have healthy chickens.
     
  3. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

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    If I thought my birds had pale combs or other issues b/c of worms, I would get a fecal float test done to see if worms are the issue. If worms are the issue, then it would be prudent to treat them with a dewormer. You can do your natural methods moving forward to help prevent a worm overload. IMO, birds given access to good free range will find natural antihelminthics on their own.

    My birds eat a lot of rhubarb leaves in the fall. I'm guessing those leaves act to purge worms. Other herbs that folks swear by: garlic, ginger, pumpkin seeds. I think the raspy grass that chickens (and dogs and cats) eat act as an antihelminthic. Many old time farmers swear by Basic H soap to worm their herds and flocks.
     
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  4. sawilliams

    sawilliams Songster

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    Natural treatments are best for prevention, but i agree if you know or suspect your hens have an active and severe case of worms its best to treat with proper medications first
     
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  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Your environment will dictate if you need to worm often or not. If you live in the north where the soil is cool or cold most of the year, or sandy or rocky mountainous soil; it may be only necessary to worm once a year.
    If your soil is warm and moist most of the time, half the time; it's worm soup and will require frequent wormings.
    One female large roundworm lays hundreds of eggs each day that end up on the soil to be picked up by other chickens...direct lifecycle.
    One worm is one worm too many.
    Most wormers are derived from plants anyway.
     
  6. Sdominique

    Sdominique Songster

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    I sometimes put hay that comes out of horse barn in their pen to give them something to scratch around in. Could the hay be a possible cause of infestation or sickness?
     
  7. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging

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    It depends; have you looked carefully at your birds, at night, with a flashlight, for mites or lice? They happen because of exposure to wild songbirds, and it's not a rare problem.
    Have a fecal checked at your veterinarian's, and if intestinal parasites are an issue, use the right product for them.
    Mary
     
  8. Sdominique

    Sdominique Songster

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    I have checked for mites at night, haven't found any but I have treated birds, henhouse and pen with diatemaceous earth anyway. I've never had any kinds of problems with my chickens for years so I'm confused as to why now all of a sudden.
     
  9. CzyChikenMath

    CzyChikenMath Songster

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    just curious what's best for mites?
     
  10. ChickNanny13

    ChickNanny13 Crossing the Road

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    Permethrin 10 found at feed stores
     
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