Chicken Diarrhoeh!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Rhode Island, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. Rhode Island

    Rhode Island Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 30, 2012
    Australia
    My chickens have been doing some bad diarrhea lately. Cures?
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    It really depends on the cause. Loose droppings are not necessarily a cause for alarm by themselves. There are several foods that can give chickens of any age loose droppings, pumpkins, squash, things like that for example. As long as they are otherwise healthy, it's not a big deal. Some if us think feeding them these things is actually very healthy for them.

    But the key is "as long as they are otherwise healthy". Loose droppings is a sign you need to watch them very carefully. It could be a sign something is very wrong. It's good that you noticed so you can watch them.

    My immediate concern would be coccidiosis. Chickens pick up certain parasites from their environment. That's just the way it is and often it is not a big deal. Certain parasites can cause "Coccidiosis" if the number gets out of hand. A few of these don't hurt them. It is actually good because it helps them build up an immunity. Due to the life cycle of those parasites, the numbers can more easily get out of hand if your brooder, coop, or run have wet manure in them. So if you keep them dry, you really help yourself and your chicks.

    How do you tell if your chicks have coccidiosis? In really severe cases (and these are life-threatening and require immediate action) they have bloody droppings. But a lot of coccidiosis infections do not cause bloody droppings. Loose droppings are an indication it might be present but I'd go more by how they act. If they are active and running around, I'd not really be concerned. If one or more are inactive, spending all it's time in one place and scrunched up as if it is cold and just does not look active or healthy, I'd get concerned.

    In any case, keep your brooder dry. Don't let wet manure build up.

    You can treat with Corid. It's specifically meant for coccidiosis. Most medicated feed and Corid have Amprolium in it as the active "medicated" part, but the dosage in medicated feed is pretty low. It is meant more as a preventative, not to treat an active case. If you are going to treat, go with the higher dosage in Corid.
     
  3. Rhode Island

    Rhode Island Out Of The Brooder

    63
    1
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    Nov 30, 2012
    Australia
    Thankyou SO much. I had guessed it was Coccidiosis but i didnt know much about it. We seem to have something outside of our house that affects weak animals. Two chickens have died. The first sign was diarrhoeh. Then after a few days they would start tripping over things. Then they would go into their coop and collapse on the ground. They would stay there until they were dead. It was horrible to watch. I just wanted to put them out of their misery but i didnt know how. Oh and it involved them becoming very light to pick up. They also didnt grow.
     
  4. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Are we talking about chicks here or grown hens? If chicks then yes, I'd be considering coccidiosis. If these are grown hens I'd probably suspect a worm infestation before coccidiosis.
     
  5. Rhode Island

    Rhode Island Out Of The Brooder

    63
    1
    31
    Nov 30, 2012
    Australia
    Well they were almost full grown. They were on the verge of laying. They never reached the age to lay because they stopped growing.
     

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