Chicken disease?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Adrien515, Apr 23, 2017.

  1. Adrien515

    Adrien515 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Earlier I noticed my chicken had this scabbing on her face. I picked her up and got a closer look. There's a bunch of these raised bumps on her face, on her lower wobble thing (sorry I don't know the name) and around the eyes and beak and all over. Several look kind of yellow-y. Most have scabs on them. I don't know if this is from chickens peaking at her or not (she's low ranked so she's always getting pecked) or it's a symptom. I also don't know if there's puss in it. I attached two picture links above. I don't know if it's contagious, and I don't think she's had it for very long because I was handling her a day or two ago. PLEASE ANSWER IF YOU HAVE ANY KNOWLAGE ABOUT THIS AS QUICK AS YOU CAN. I don't know what to do.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2017
  2. brookechooka89

    brookechooka89 New Egg

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    Apr 23, 2017
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  3. brookechooka89

    brookechooka89 New Egg

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    Apr 23, 2017
    Google fowl pox. Think of it like chicken pox for that humans get. Viral infraction and contagious. Best to seperate from others and feed all chickens (wether showing signs or not) a highly nutritious meal daily to help bodies stay strong enough to fight it off. You can get a vaccine if 20% or less of your flock is showing signs. That way they can fight it quicker.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2017
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  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    That is dry fowl pox, a virus carried by mosquitoes that runs it's course over 3 weeks or so with no treatment required. Make sure they are eating and drinking well. Look inside the beaks and throat with a flash light for any yellow patches that could be wet pox, a much more serious disease. I would get some Terramycin eye ointment--ask for it at TSC and feed stores, and apply it to eyes where there are scabs around the eyes, to help prevent secondary bacterial infections that can lead to blindness.
     

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