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Chicken feeding, genetics, and disease

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by beevolleyball3, Jan 16, 2013.

  1. beevolleyball3

    beevolleyball3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Report on chicken feeding, genetics, and disease
    Hi, my name is Claire Bee and I am going to be talking about chicken feeding, genetics, and disease. My first paragraph is on chicken feeding. Chickens need about 16 to 20 percent of protein. Most small flock owners feed their birds scratch grain. Scratch is a mixture of two or more cracked grains such as corn, oats, wheat, millet, etc. Chickens love scratch grains. They instinctively scratch the earth to find bugs and pebbles. The pebbles help grind the food up because chickens don’t have teeth. My chickens devour our table scraps. But if you do feed your birds’ table scraps stay away from fatty foods. Chickens love vegetables. They also like strongly scented foods like onions, garlic, salami, and fish. Foods like that can flavor the hen’s eggs. Also don’t feed your chickens a lot of “people” food because they might turn up their beaks to the scratch grains or whatever you are feeding them on a daily basis.
    This paragraph is on genetics. Genetics are the science of hereditary, dealing with resemblances and differences of related organisms resulting from the interaction of their genes and environment. In intermediary hereditary the mother is a white homozygote and the father is a black homozygote. The mother has two identical white genes and the father has two identical black genes. During fertilization the mother gives away on of her white genes and the father gives away one of his black genes. The offspring will therefore, be gray.
    The last thing I am going to talk about is chickens disease. I am going to talk about one specific disease. It is called Coccidiosis. Coccidiosis is a disease caused by the coccidial protozoan organism, an internal parasite called Eimeria. These live inside the cells that line the bird’s intestine. As they reproduce they cause bleeding and swelling in the intestine. The side effects of this are blood in the chicken’s droppings, ruffled feathers, a hunched up appearance, and white diarrhea around the vent. To treat this disease veterinarians use a drug called coxoid. For the drug to be effective you have to administer it in the chicken’s water. To prevent Coccidiosis you should keep your coops clean, dry, and well ventilated. This was my report on chicken feeding, genetics, and disease.
     
  2. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Those are 3 interesting facts. I expected to read about the influence of feeding and genetics on disease though... ;)
     
  3. beevolleyball3

    beevolleyball3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    sorry, but this forum is on breeds, genetics, and showing. I just posted a report i wrote![​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2013
  4. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Quote from beevolleyball3 Is the White Hen used Silver, Recessive or Dominate based?
    I ask this because if the parent stock is pure the offspring would be,

    Black Male over Silver based Female - Offspring Black
    Black Male over Recessive White Female - Offspring Black
    Black Male over Dominate White Female - Offspring White

    I also never heard of Grey offspring coming from a Black Male over a White Female unless the White was not pure for color.


    Quote from beevolleyball3 Not all vets use the brand name Coxoid (in fact I don't know one that does). The poultry owners and livestock vets around here will use either Corid (Amprolium) or Di-Methox (Sulfadimemethoxine).


    Chris
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2013
  5. beevolleyball3

    beevolleyball3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry but i don't know the answer to your question. You have me stumped now! Thanks for that information! I wrote this about 2 years ago so the drugs vets use have changed I am sure.[​IMG]
     
  6. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    Hi Beevolleyball3,
    It's a very nice report! I think you covered a lot of the basics well. Gives a lot of starting points for interested readers to investigate further. Well done!
    Best Success,
    Karen in western PA
     
  7. beevolleyball3

    beevolleyball3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you!!!
     

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