Chicken fertility

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by NysiaAnera, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. NysiaAnera

    NysiaAnera Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Malad City, ID
    I have been looking all over for a spot to ask this question. I hope this is it. If not, please point me in the right direction.

    I am totally baffled! I recently put together an incubator and have been hatching chicks from my own flock. I don't have a 100% hatch rate, but so far it has been great. I have several roosters in my flock, and I seldom come across an egg that is not fertilized.

    The first batch I did, I also had 7 eggs from my brother. Not one started to develop. At day 8, I removed them and cracked them all open to see what was going on. 6 were not fetilized, one was fertile but did not start. So he has been checking his eggs to see if they started being fertilized again. When he started getting fertile eggs, he started collecting them for me to try again. Every 3rd day he would crack one open to make sure they were fertile. Everything was set, and I put 7 more of his in 7 days ago. I candled them tonight, and there is no development. However, every one of the ones from my hens are developing just fine.

    So, I am wondering what would cause his hen's eggs to be fertile one day, and not the next. Why is it so hit or miss? If I crack open his eggs and find that they are fertile but did not develop, why would that be? What would cause them to not even start, when my hens' eggs set on the same day are developing great?
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2017
  2. NysiaAnera

    NysiaAnera Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 22, 2015
    Malad City, ID
    Oh, and all 7 of the eggs were collected over a period of 10 days, so they were not old.
     
  3. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    Africa - near the equator
    Could depend on the age of his cock birds, their respective mating techniques, and the feathering of the hens that they are covering (e.g. i had to trim the rump feathers of my rumpless EE before i got fertile eggs). I'm sure other members will add to these thoughts.
     

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