Chicken Fighting

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by starrzfly, Feb 5, 2017.

  1. starrzfly

    starrzfly Just Hatched

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    I had three chickens; a Wyandotte, Easter Egger, and a Cochin. When they were only a few months old I got two Ameraucanas (all the same age). I introduced them very slowly, keeping them in a pen next to the run for weeks. When I finally introduced them one of the Ameraucanas stood her ground and quickly moved up in the pecking order. The submissive Ameraucana has always been shy and submissive but they accepted her with no issues. For several months they all got along but the two Ameraucanas would sleep separate from the other three. Then a couple months ago the dominant Ameraucana joined the three, so the submissive Ameraucana has been sleeping alone. Then all of a sudden a couple weeks ago they started attacking the submissive Ameraucana (they had all been living together for 6-8months without issues). Chasing her nonstop, jumping on her and pulling out all her feathers and not letting her access the food and water. Her sister then betrayed her as well so they all were attacking her. So I took out the two biggest bullies (Cochin and Wyandotte) and put them in a cage for a week and a half. Slowly the dominant Ameraucana and Easter Egger started sleeping with the submissive one. Since the three that were uncaged were living together fine after a week and a half I decided to let the bullies back in. The bullies immediatelely started right back attacking the submissive Ameraucana AND now attacking the dominant Ameraucana as well, and she didn't defend herself like she used to. So after observing them for a little while I decided to put the bullies back in the cage. Any ideas of what to do now?
     
  2. feedman77

    feedman77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Maybe just put one bully back in and see how it goes. Sometimes without back up they might show acceptance
     
  3. starrzfly

    starrzfly Just Hatched

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    Feb 5, 2017
    Well I did actually put the biggest bully back first and watched them for a few minutes but the second biggest bully was still picking on them and the two nice ones were picking on the submissive one too, so then I put the second bully back. Should I try to let the second biggest bully out for longer and see if they settle down?
     
  4. feedman77

    feedman77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would put one in keep the other away and out of sight. Let the one you put in stay for an hour or longer unless he starts picking harshly on them.

    If he does ok let him roost with them. Then try the 2nd bird the next day.

    Even small changes effect the pecking order
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2017
  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    How big is your coop? Your run?
     
  6. luvpets2016

    luvpets2016 New Egg

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    I have an 8 by 12 insulated coop (live in Michigan). An temporary 10 by 10 dog fence . We got the coop just before winter with an 18 by 23 ft fence area but didnt have time b/f winter to set up.The first 3 ft is enclosed for grain, counter etc.
    I did have 8 chicks and 1 turkey. The turkey had been with them for years . After getting this coop ..I decided its too small for the turkey so I gave him to my brother.

    My old coop was an 8 by 5 ft renovated camper. not insulated and no feeding area. I hung feeders outside under the camper cab part.
    I just got some more chicks (for free) , wasn't planning on getting anymore! There is 12 chicks and 1 rooster. Have never had a rooster so it should be entertaining!
    It is enclosed in an 300 ft electrical fence area.

    Not sure what your looking for but maybe some of this will help.
     
  7. jsizzle

    jsizzle New Egg

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    I assume these are all hens. Have you found any injuries or blood? I know it sounds awful but unless one of them is in true danger of loosing their life you have to let the pecking order work itself out. At the very least, know that separating one only serves to put her at the bottom of the order. When you reintroduce her, depending on her nature which already caused a separation, it will start all over as they try to establish order.

    This time of year is also hard for us keepers. We had an easy (ish) winter and our chickens are ready to "do their job" so I think the young birds get a little more "animal like" this time of year. I'm guessing this is the first spring of your hens maturity. I know it's not easy to witness but allowing your flock to work it out will make everyone (including you) happy.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2017
  8. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pullets do not have a certain time of year they mature(Like their first spring is literally just like any hen or roosters spring).They mature when ever they start laying eggs,that is their maturing point,which is usually around 4,5 and 6 months,maybe a little later then that.Just like with cockerels,once they reach that age,that is when they mature and you start noticing crowing,fighting,or teh girls begins squatting,and the roosters begin raping.It usually hardest few months with roosters.
    I would defiantly give your chicks some time to grow up. Once they can fight back,I would put them in with the older ones,this will probably help the bullied hens.And roosters really helpkeep things mellow.
     

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