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Chicken First Aid Kit: what medications/treatments should I keep on hand?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by hyzenthlay, Aug 3, 2016.

  1. hyzenthlay

    hyzenthlay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What do you keep on hand at home for your chicken "first aid kit"?

    I've had a small flock of chickens for about 7 years, and knock on wood they've all been pretty healthy so far. But, I've recently expanded my flock a bit, and I figure with more hens comes the chance for more health problems. The feed store is pretty far from me, so I want to keep a small stock of things on hand to be able to treat common issues as they arise. I'm talking mostly about things that need quick treatment--for anything that can wait a couple days to be addressed, I can usually get what I need from Amazon or a drive out to Tractor Supply.

    Here's what I'm thinking so far:

    Vetericyn - wounds
    Saline wash - wounds
    styptic powder - wounds
    vetwrap - wounds
    Electrolytes - general distress
    VetRx - respiratory issues, scaly legs
    Corid -Coccidiosis

    Am I on the right track? What else would you add? I've never wormed my chickens, but I'm thinking maybe I should start, and add that to the list (thinking Wazine and Safe-guard).

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2016
  2. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    Sounds good so far. I'd also recommend adding:

    - NutriDrench. Works for vitamin deficiencies, but also a good general picker-upper like electrolytes

    - Olive oil. Good for issues like impacted crop or egg binding

    - Neosporin without pain medication, can be used alongside Vetricyn as a wound aid

    - Oxytetracycline. For respiratory issues, individual or contagious.

    - Clavamox, if you can get it. Best broad spectrum antibiotic for treatment after things such as serious wounds; can be hard to get without visiting a vet.

    - Super glue, for repairing simple skin wounds without stitching

    - Pick-No-More (alternatively, BluKote, though I prefer Pick-No-More). Anti picking solution and healing aid for small wounds and cuts.

    - Small syringe without needle, for hand watering or giving medication
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2016
  3. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    The only thing I might add is some epsom salts. Great for soaking anything from feet to bum.

    Everyone has a preference for de-wormers, that said Wazine will only treat roundworms, so personally I would go with Safe-Guard or Valbazen because they treat more.
    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2015/11/control-treatment-of-worms-in-chickens.html
     
  4. hyzenthlay

    hyzenthlay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you, that is very helpful! I have olive oil, super glue, and neosporin on hand already for general use, so that's taken care of. I added Nutri-Drench, Pick-no-more, and small syringes to my cart.

    If Oxytetracycline is the same as Terramycin, it looks like I can also get that at Amazon--although the one I see there is an ophthalmic ointment, not to be used internally, so I'm guessing that's not what you're talking about for the treatment of respiratory issues. What form of oxytetracycline do you mean? Is Duramycin (tetracycline) close enough?

    Clavamox does seem trickier as you say--all the websites I found seem to require a vet prescription. I had to take one of my hens to the vet last year--maybe I'll call them and see if they'd prescribe me some to keep on hand.

    Thanks again!
     
  5. hyzenthlay

    hyzenthlay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Epsom salts! Added. Thank you!

    I read on BYC somewhere that if you are worming for the first time, it is good to do Wazine first because it is smaller spectrum, and it can be too much of a shock to the hens to do the broader spectrum dewormer first if you have not been worming your flock before. Not sure if that's true, but that's why I put both--in order to use Wazine first, then Safe-guard a couple weeks later. Knock on wood we've never had a problem with worms that I know of, but if I'm going to start a deworming program I wanted to be sure not to do it in a way that could be harmful.
     
  6. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    Duramycin is fine, it's basically the same thing.

    Oh, I forgot to add ibuprofen. You probably have it on hand already, but ibuprofen is an effective pain killer for poultry. Some websites will say to use aspirin but I have personally discussed this with my avian vet and she has said that ibuprofen is much safer. Dosage is one (1) 200mg tablet, crushed, per 2 cups of drinking water; in very hot weather, it may be used at 200mg/per 3 cups.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2016
  7. hyzenthlay

    hyzenthlay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great to know! I always keep ibuprofen on hand, but I didn't know I could give it to the hens. Thank you!!

    p.s. here's to hoping that by keeping a pantry well stocked with first aid items, I won't need to use them very much--you know, like how it never rains when you remember to pack your umbrella! ;)
     
  8. Cacique500

    Cacique500 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd also keep some Corid on hand. If you get an outbreak of coccidosis you want them on meds asap.

    Also grab some blu-kote...i've used that a lot with my flock.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2016
  9. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I'll add a couple more things, disposable gloves and a small pair of sharp scissors.

    The gloves of course are a good idea for your household emergency supply, but come in handy if you have something "icky" to deal with[​IMG]
    Scissors, I keep outside in a small box near the coop, comes in handy to trim a broken feather, etc.
     
  10. hyzenthlay

    hyzenthlay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great suggestions! Blu-Kote and/or Pick No More are on the list, as is Corid. I have the small scissors, but I actually don't have the gloves--another good idea, so I'll add that. Thanks! :)
     

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