Chicken Growth Plate Damage

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by clarkebar78, Apr 20, 2018.

  1. clarkebar78

    clarkebar78 In the Brooder

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    Oct 10, 2015
    Connecticut
    Hello Everyone I welcome any advice and info on my latest chicken saga! I have a 8/9week old rare breed Death Layer Roo that I invested in with a pullet to breed. Very happy with the GreenFire line as it was imported and from a reputable breeder.

    Over what seems one evening I noticed a roost bar twisted low in brooder and my Death Layer Roo limping. To the vet we go and $230 later after X-ray s and inflamatory injection we have a dignosis of a slightly bruised or inflamed growth plate in the tibia. Time will hopefully heal and tell if it’s become a damaged growth plate which will result in one leg might be affected and grow shorter. Ugh!!!!! So upset!!

    Vets directive; separate alone or with calm lady pullet and allow to rest over this week. Monday/Tuesday if leg still deteriorated give oral inflamatory prescription given. No bandage needed, brace or anything else needed.

    Now I have the bird separated in its own crate from other hyper teeny boppers. ...I might move pullet death layer with him in smaller crate as he and his lady seems to still snuggle through the crate edges. She even feeds in his dish! They may be calmer together.

    Thanks in advance for anything...bc I am sooooo saddened for this little guy!!!
     

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  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Nov 27, 2008
    Glen St Mary, Florida
    I would follow the vets advice. Leg injuries take a long time to heal, sometimes several weeks to a couple of months or even longer. Keep the rooster as calm as possible. You dont want him jumping around or pacing in the cage causing further injury.
    You can add vitamin B complex on top of his feed that may help speed up recovery. Crush a couple pills into powder and just sprinkle it on top of his feed to eat.
    Remember, this is going to be a long healing process, have patience and dont forget to keep his cage clean.
    I've dealt with quite a few leg injuries in the past and have had a very good recovery rate especially with hens, but not so good with roosters. Keeping his favorite hen close to him is best and will help keep him calm.
     
    Wyorp Rock likes this.
  3. clarkebar78

    clarkebar78 In the Brooder

    7
    0
    27
    Oct 10, 2015
    Connecticut
    0C2A1C55-DC55-4BA7-A945-106E7E15E527.jpeg D6429C26-14B9-49AC-84AF-7617C3F6B30C.jpeg D6429C26-14B9-49AC-84AF-7617C3F6B30C.jpeg https://www.backyardchickens.com/members/dawg53.19157/

    Thanks dawg53 for taking the time to give me a response and vote of confidence. I actually did his lady with him and see keeps him calm very much so than separated. And he is still next to his other ladies in another crate. I will also look into the vitamin b complex. You are suggesting human vitamin b complex crushed?

    Thanks again:)) I hope he heals well this was my first breeding couple at a hefty price ...I was also disappointed in the possibility I won’t be able to breed this pair and bring this breed into more recognition in US:(((
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Nov 27, 2008
    Glen St Mary, Florida
    Yes, human vitamin B complex found at any drug store. Crush a couple tablets into powder and sprinkle it on his food. Once a week for a month should be good enough and hopefully he will be healed by then.:fl
     

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