Chicken had skin patch ripped off, help ASAP

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Nickeyo, Nov 17, 2013.

  1. Nickeyo

    Nickeyo Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have a little Phoenix bantam that has just been attacked by a large silkie cross, this bird is now bleeding into a bucket for eating. He got her by some neck feathers and ripped at her, he pulled a large patch of feathers and the skin from her leaving the entire back of her neck naked so you can see muscles etc, what should I do, I have put anti septic spray on and have put on a spray on plaster.

    Please help ASAP
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Of course separate her in a cage. She may be in shock for ahwile. Clean as best as you can with betadine, hibiclens, or soap and water. Let it dry, then apply Neosporin without pain med daily . Leave it open to air if you can. These types of wounds are common, and unless they become infected there is a good chance she will recover unless she has internal injuries. Get her to eat protein--eggs, tuna, dry cat food as well as her feed. Good luck.
     
  3. Nickeyo

    Nickeyo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ok should we try to stitch up, my mums a doc so she knows how
     
  4. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    Sorry about the attack on your Phoenix Bantam. I agree with all that Eggsessive wrote. I don't think you really need to give her stitches. Chickens are pretty amazing at growing back skin. We had a little Old English Game Bantam who had quite a gash on her chest due to a hawk attack, and we decided not to give stitches to allow the wound to drain. She healed quite well even though she was in shock at first. If you smell any signs of infection, which your mom will recognize, then at least she will be comfortable with injectable antibiotics. Hopefully you wont have to worry about that though, because triple antibiotic ointment is pretty good at preventing infection for open wounds. I hope she heals well.
     
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  5. farmtotable

    farmtotable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with everything Eggcessive wrote. I had a very similar situation last year when one of my three day old chicks got "scalped" by another chick. She literally had no skin from the back of her head down to her butt. It looked like her entire back was ripped off. My husband and I washed it off with very mild soap and water, then rinsed it with warm water, patted it dry, and continuously applied Neosporin so the wound wouldn't dry out and start cracking. It took a while, but she healed completely normally with no stitches or bandages needed. She was isolated in a cage by herself throughout the entire process though. And by cage, I mean she got her own little comfy, clean cubby in our warm bedroom where I could check on her constantly.
     
  6. cayucaipa

    cayucaipa Out Of The Brooder

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    new here, but i had to respond to this. in 1978 i had a hen that was attacked by a coyote and ended up with a dime sized hole in her throat/trachea area. i swear i could feel her breathing through that hole. i had a can of Furox aerosol that i used on horse wounds so i grabbed that and caked it on the hens neck about 3/8s to 1/2 inch thick= it dries very quickly. i lost my hold on the hen and she ran back to the flock. i kept an eye on her for a few days but she lived with a big yellow stain on her neck for what seemed like a year. she lived for another 4 or 5 years that i remember.
    .
    Furox(if still availible) was/is a bright yellow medication that we used a lot for minor to serious cuts and scrapes on our horses/goats/dogs etc. and stopped bleeding almost immediately. good luck with your chicken:)
     
  7. Nickeyo

    Nickeyo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Th know you all for your replies
     

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