1. 603Chickens

    603Chickens Hatching

    5
    1
    8
    May 24, 2019
    Seacoast NH
    I am new to chickens this year and I am looking to build a chicken run, similar to the pictures below. I currently have 5 chickens but would like to build a run that is suitable for 8. I am not very construction savy so I am hoping someone who has built something similar or who is constriction savy can give me a list of materials/instructions on how to build!

    Should I have more on the roof then chicken wire?

    Also I plan on putting the run in an area with alot of grass is this ok or should I dig it up for the chickens?

    TIA

    Stephanie
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    [​IMG]
     
  2. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    Jul 23, 2018
    Apalachin, NY
    My Coop
    Are you going to be attaching the run to your coop?
    How level is the site you want to build on?
    Do you have access to a truck and tools?
    Where are you located in the world? You can update your profile page with that information. It makes a difference on how you build. If you are in a high wind area, you will want to anchor it to the ground in some fashion.
    I would put a solid roof on it. Either polycarbonate, metal or shingles over OSB.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2019
    603Chickens likes this.
  3. rosemarythyme

    rosemarythyme Crowing

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    Lumber usually comes in 4' increments so multiples of 4 will give you the biggest bang for your buck, so I'd say 8x12 at the smallest, and if you have more room, go larger (12x12, etc). And make sure it's tall enough that you can stand up straight inside - for some folks 6' is enough but if you have a tall family, 8' might be better.

    For the roof, a solid roof is most secure and weather proof but that's up to you if you want it. You could do wire mesh or netting as well, depending on your predators and climate. If you have a heavy snow load some sort of slanted roof would be your best bet, but wire/netting can handle some snow, if you don't get a lot.

    The chickens will destroy the grass for you so I'd leave it for them to enjoy/destroy, then once it's mostly gone you can add your litter of choice. Sand and deep litter are the most popular options, each has pros and cons to consider.
     
    blackdog043 and 603Chickens like this.
  4. jthornton

    jthornton Crowing

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    Aug 30, 2017
    Poplar Bluff, MO
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    The chickens will take care of the grass in no time!

    You should put your location in your profile, it makes a difference.

    JT
     
    603Chickens likes this.
  5. 603Chickens

    603Chickens Hatching

    5
    1
    8
    May 24, 2019
    Seacoast NH
    The place for the run is pretty level. We have access to tools and a truck. We are in Seacoast NH.
     
  6. 603Chickens

    603Chickens Hatching

    5
    1
    8
    May 24, 2019
    Seacoast NH
    Thank you for the reply! What do you recommend for a slanted roof? We are in NH so there will be a good amount of snow!
     
  7. rosemarythyme

    rosemarythyme Crowing

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    Jul 3, 2016
    Pac NW
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    A metal roof would probably the most sturdy. Some folks like polycarbonate panels like suntuf but I don't know how well that'll do with a lot of snow weight.
     
  8. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    Jul 23, 2018
    Apalachin, NY
    My Coop
    I used them on my old run and they held up just fine to the 16" deepest load we had last year. The snow slides off pretty quickly. But I had about a 12/5 pitch on it.
     
    blackdog043 likes this.

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