Chicken Stock and Fatty floater

Discussion in 'Egg, Chicken, & Other Favorite Recipes' started by SC-ChickMom, Feb 29, 2012.

  1. SC-ChickMom

    SC-ChickMom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 21, 2011
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    First let me start by saying I am amazed at how different chicken stock from my own chickens is from store bought chickens. After cooking the bones and everything down and letting it cool, there is this floating fat layer I have never gotten with store bought chicken.

    That being said, what do I do with that fat.

    When I make pie crust for quiches I usually use a mixture of either crisco or cream cheese and butter for the crust. Can I substitute the chicken fat for the crisco?

    What else can it be used for?

    How long can it be stored and how is the best way?

    Today I attempt to can for the first time. My beautiful, tasty stock is going in the pressure canner this afternoon. Tips? Warnings?
     
  2. FarmTillURdead

    FarmTillURdead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In the old days when people didn't have crisco that is what they used. Personally, I think it's easier and more natural for your body to digest. I save the fat for frying the chicken wings in! It will knock your socks off! I have had my gallbladder removed and when I eat fried food my liver hurts (yeah, I can tell!) When I eat food fried in animal fat - it doesn't. But I don't make a habit of it either... just a few times a year.
    It is important to cook the grease at a low temp to get all of the moisture out. I will thaw and then re-freeze a solid block of fat then take a spoon and scrape the bottom layer of stuff off that might be broth moisture just as it starts to thaw some. When cooking don't heat your grease over 375 or it turns to unhealthy trans fats. I fry things in chicken and turkey fat under 350. Just until golden brown. Honestly - I don't think there is a better thing for frying in on the planet. The flavor is incredible!!
    [​IMG]
    I pressure cook my (sandwich) birds on a cake cooling rack over a casserole dish inside my pressure cooker (I have a big one). It makes a beautiful mostly clear broth. I put the dish in the fridge and the fat separates leaving "chicken jelly" underneath. I skim the fat off and freeze it. When I get a container full - I food saver it and can keep the fat frozen up to two years if there are no air pockets in the bag.
    Then I simmer the saved broth down a bit more and then I pressure can it hot. *Your broth must be cooked down enough to "jelly up" in the fridge. (dunno why - just what pressure canning books say for food safety.) This step just makes the fat to easy to peel off - so I always do it.

    If you got a good fat seperation and was able to skim off most of it you shouldn't have a problem sealing your jars. If you do - it's from not enough head space (i use an inch) or from fat greasing the seal when your jar burps to create the vaccuum. I pressure cook my broth for 70 min. and let the canner cool - closed - on it's own on the stove. I want to be sure to destroy any and all pathogens. (sometimes I don't get to the broth for a day or two because I get busy and forget about it separating in the fridge.) Hence, the long cook time.
    I have never gotten sick doing it this way. My broth doesn't usually last a year around here. I use it for breads (instead of milk or water), rice (instead of water), and all kinds of soups (it makes a killer summer squash soup! We use that as a staple! So easy to grow and make!).
    I dump the used fat around poles and barns to keep the weeds from growing - I don't reuse it. I don't feel it would taste good the second time around or be as safe. (even though I know heat kills stuff.)
    I have read that there is a way to pressure can the fat but it's tricky and seals don't always work. I'm too busy not to get a sure thing so I prefer freezing.
    Hope that gives you some ideas. BackwoodsHomeMagazine has lots of ideas on this subject too! I hope you try it! You won't regret all the work! It made my superbowl sunday awesome - and as far as cooking whole birds - the wings cook away anyway - so I'm saving them for something special!
    [​IMG] The store charges 3.00 a pound for wings in football season - I use to just give them to the dogs! [​IMG]
     
  3. Chickadee55

    Chickadee55 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 17, 2010
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    Your my new hero. [​IMG] where do you find the time??
     
  4. FarmTillURdead

    FarmTillURdead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] LOL! Awesome! Thanks for the compliment! [​IMG]It's all I do - and the only thing I have ever had a passion for - I focused on it and let it grow. God loves it when people follow their passions and he provides for them accordingly! Bless you and keep trucking doing what you love. I was so excited to hear someone else was canning broth! I couldn't help but pipe up! I learn so much reading stuff online from other peoples journeys I thought I should share too.[​IMG]
    Chicken therapy can do wonders for a person! [​IMG] I use to be a mess until I got some!! I'm a long way from a gal who only brushed her hair once a week and it was a huge accomplishment just to make the bed in a day. [​IMG] A very humble thanks again for your generous compliments - [​IMG]
     
  5. SC-ChickMom

    SC-ChickMom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 21, 2011
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    My first 8 pints of stock are in the pantry. I have more stock in the fridge to can today. I wanted to start with a small amount just in case I did something wrong. I think my husband thinks I have gone crazy because of the cheering as I heard the pop. I said this is how I know I did it right.

    Oh and I used some of the fat last night to fry meatballs. I usually make lots of meatballs at one time, bake in the oven and freeze. Then when I am ready to eat them, I defrost, roll in flour and fry. The chicken fat was yummy.

    Today the fat will be mixed with butter to make a pie crust for a chicken(Left overs), spinach and swiss quiche.
     
  6. SC-ChickMom

    SC-ChickMom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here are the jars of goodness:
    [​IMG]
     
  7. gram of five

    gram of five Out Of The Brooder

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    Good thread, very informative. Been canning for many years and learned a lot. I love chicken broth!! Thanks!!
     
  8. FarmTillURdead

    FarmTillURdead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] Oh that's such good stuff! I yell when my jars pop too! It's a "seal" of approval! [​IMG]
    I went back and double checked and my manual says:
    Pour boiling hot stock in jars and pressure cook them at 15 pounds. 25 min for pints and 25 min for quarts. So I guess I was getting a little crazy with the overkill there.
    You have a lot of headspace in your jars - was this your first time using your canner? My first time or two also had a lot of head space - I figured it was the seals on the canner adjusting.
    Aiming for that 1 inch and keeping it will help prevent spoiling. I'm pretty sure you filled them up right? and left your 1 inch of space? Well, sure you did! Your pressure canner pushed broth out of those jars and you still got a good seal - which means you did a super job skimming off your fat!
    Due to the large head space I wouldn't keep these jars for more than a 4 months or so. I'm really not sure what causes it - but my first jars of tomatoes looked the same way the first time or two I used mine. I have researched it on-line numerous times and I always come up with nothing. I would assume too much pressure but I have a good gague on mine - so if anyone knows please tell me! I'd like to know!
    Super job SC ChickMom! That makes the best chicken dumplings and chicken noodle soups on cold winter days!
    ... I think I am going to have to steal your meatball idea. After a few cocktails, before dinner, my meatballs always lack being ...round. [​IMG]
    Thanks for the idea! I think it's genius! I still have lots of growing to do! [​IMG]
     
  9. FarmTillURdead

    FarmTillURdead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I made some baked french fries last night. I cut up potatoes (sometimes sweet potatoes - no rinse!), rinse them well in water, drain and pat dry then coat in oil. I dumped some peanut oil on them and started to toss to coat them when I realized some melted chicken fat would have made them incredible! Yummy yes - 100% healthy no - but once in a while it's alright! I bake fries at 400 for 25-30 min on a cookie cooling rack on top a cookie sheet with sides - so oil can run off - just until they blister a little bit "blanching them". Then I pull them out and let them cool to room temp - until I am ready for dinner. Then I cook them for 10-15 min at 425 until crispy. Very good "non soggy" home fries with a lot less grease than fast food fries. Also makes timing good for burgers on the grill fries go in the oven when burgers go on the grill.
    @ SC-Chick Mom - I'd love to hear how your crust came out!
     
  10. SallyF

    SallyF Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 5, 2009
    Middle Tennessee
    As to what to do with all that wonderful rendered chicken fat, a long time ago there was a restaurant in Nashville Tennessee that was famous for its apple pie... the crust was made with chicken fat.
     

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