Chicken Tractor Security

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by nannanc, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. nannanc

    nannanc Just Hatched

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    We are planning to build a chicken tractor and I was wondering how everyone secures the bottom of the run? I can't bury wire since we will be moving it frequently. They will be in a secure, raised coop at night. Is it too risky to have the run open if they are secure in their coop at night?
     
  2. Zoomie

    Zoomie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mora, NM USA
    Hi, @nannanc and welcome to BYC! [​IMG]

    If you put your location in your profile, people will be able to help you out better. Knowing where you are lets people know what type of predator you are likely to deal with during the day. For example if you live right next to Denali National Park you will have different predators during the day than if you live in downtown Houston.

    I don't think most people put wire under their chicken tractor. But it kind of depends what the situation is; I live and work on a farm, I am here nearly all the time so I'm able to watch things very closely. If I was going to be gone for the day or the weekend, no way would I put my chickens in a tractor, way too many dogs running loose here. So I think it will kind of depend on your situation.
     
  3. nannanc

    nannanc Just Hatched

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    I updated my profile, thank you! We live in mid MO. We live in town on about 1/2 acre near a lot of woods. We have a lot of raccoons, possums, skunks, and foxes. Plus the occasional wondering dog. But, I do stay at home so they wouldn't be unattended for long periods of time :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I live almost dead central MO. Currently working with a high school in KC-MO. General approach for me is to have perimeter that keeps predators away from tractors. Hotwire keeps dogs away and can impede foxes and Coyotes. High school used electrified poultry netting which also keeps raccoons, oppossums and skunks away. I also use dogs.

    A setup I have played with involves solar charged hotwire attached directly to the chicken tractor. This approach does nor require a grounding rod.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017
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  5. dheltzel

    dheltzel Overrun With Chickens

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    Good ideas. I add a 2 ft wide welded wire "skirt around all my chicken tractors (had 5 last summer, probably more this year). I attach it so I can flip the wire up against the side and attach it while moving. I use old boards as weights on the skirts, as an extra precaution. I have never had a predator penetrate my skirting. I have had them reach through the wire a little above ground level where I was lax in attaching the HW cloth. Lesson learned.
     
  6. nannanc

    nannanc Just Hatched

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    Thanks! Hotwire is a great idea, but I also have little ones and I would hate for them to get a hold of it. We have 2 dogs, so hopefully that will help, too.
     
  7. nannanc

    nannanc Just Hatched

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    Great idea!
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    I looked at your album of this and didn't see a pic of the skirts in the up position for moving tractor....do you some pics that show that?
     
  9. dheltzel

    dheltzel Overrun With Chickens

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    No, not with them in the up position, but you can make out the wire with the board laid on top. The front and back, where the runner boards stick out on each side, have the wire cut to exactly fit between the 2 boards, on the sides, is extends out past the edge of the enclosure to about where the runner boards end. When I pull up the side piece, I hook a bungee cord to it and them pull up the front wire and clip the other end of the bungee to that. Repeat for each corner. This is quick, move the feed and water and the board holding the skirt down, all take longer. With practice, it takes less than 5 min to move a hoop house and fully secure it in it's new location.
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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