chicken vs frost bite

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by chicken42626, Nov 20, 2014.

  1. chicken42626

    chicken42626 Out Of The Brooder

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    winter is here and my chickens has been on winter lock down and I notice my roster has frost bite on his comb their coop has been winter ready is there anything to prevent frost bite
     
  2. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member

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    Hello, most recommend vaseline on combs/wattles to prevent frost bite.
     
  3. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Welcome to BYC! [​IMG]We're glad to have you.

    The best way to prevent frostbite is to make sure that your coop is well ventilated. Ventilation is extremely important! Moisture collecting in the air leads to frostbite and other problems. Make sure there isn't any draft, but you need to have plenty of ventilation.

    In my experience, vaseline on the combs doesn't really work. All it has done for me is drip down the birds feathers, creating a sticky mess. But, others have had success. You may want to try that.

    One other thing that can cause frostbite is water getting on the comb or wattles. I know that one reason why my birds got frostbite in the past is that they would dip their heads down to drink and the front portion of the comb would get wet. This, coupled with cold temperatures, lead to frostbite. I switched to nipple waterers, which don't cause this problem.

    Sometimes, there's not much you can do to prevent frostbite. Large combed birds may get it even if precautionary measures are taken. It is best to keep cold hardy breeds with small combs in cold climates. One of my breeds, the Wyandotte, is cold hardy and I haven't had any problems. But my bantams with large combs did have problems.

    My bantams haven't had problems with frostbite since three years ago. That's because I began heating the coop. Many people don't heat the coop, and it isn't always a good idea. But, for me, that was the only way to stop frostbite. I had large combed breeds and the temperature got down to below zero.

    With that said, be careful when heating! I tried heat lamps, but I think they almost increased the problem, and didn't help. The heat lamps only warmed the birds while they were beneath the heat lamp. They didn't stay under them the whole time, so still got some frostbite.

    I hope this helps!
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2014
  4. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    Welcome to BYC! Glad you decided to join our flock. X2 on both Wyandottes7 and sunflour with regard to frostbite. A dry coop with good ventilation to keep moisture from collecting is the most important. In the event you are still having some problems with frost bitten combs, I have found that Vaseline does help protect the combs. Please feel free to ask any other questions you may have. We are here to help in any way we can. Good luck in preventing frostbite.
     
  5. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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  6. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    Hello there and welcome to BYC! [​IMG]

    Great advice has been given here! 1 square foot of venting space per bird in your eaves or ceiling. That moisture has to go some place and if it has no place to go, it falls back down as water or frost. And don't let them roost in the rafters either. Low to the floor so there is plenty of room between the birds and the ventilation. Keep the coop really clean. All the poop in the bedding adds moisture to the air. And pick up all water as well. It will put moisture into the air as well.

    Some breeds are prone to frostbite on the comb, especially the roosters with large combs. Some people dub the combs as sometimes you just can't stop the frost bite.

    I hope you can get this solved soon.
     
  7. chicken42626

    chicken42626 Out Of The Brooder

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    i do not use a heat lamps because it may causes a fire i have a picture of the coop if you want to see it
     
  8. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    X2. Some members do use heat lamps, but I don't recommend them for the same reason. I'd rather be safe (with my flock) than sorry. :eek:)
     
  9. chicken42626

    chicken42626 Out Of The Brooder

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    i use hey as the heat source
     
  10. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! Please make yourself at home and we are here to help.

    Straw is a great heat source. It keeps them warm.

    Wyandottes has given you great info. Make sure your coop is properly ventilated. That is the most important thing.

    Here is an article on frostbite too
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/frostbite
     

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