Chicken with "bubbly" eye

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Chicks Galore3, Feb 14, 2016.

  1. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    One of my bantam silver sebright hens (almost 2 years) has always had "funky" eyes. She always seems to have one closed or squinted (not a particular eye... just one or the other.) I just figured it was a odd quirk she had, because she has a lived a perfectly happy and bossy chicken life. However, I've noticed the past couple days that the front corner of her eye has bubbles in it. They aren't odd colors or smelly or gross, it just looks like her eye is really watery and formed bubbles. Both of them are doing it. I think she is still eating and drinking. She isn't lethargic or anything, but I don't think she's quite as active. (She probably can't see as well.) Any guess to what this is? I can post pictures if needed.
     
  2. alyssaallycat

    alyssaallycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would post a picture. There's more of a chance that someone will diagnose it with a picture
     
  3. alyssaallycat

    alyssaallycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've never heard of what you are describing. It might be an infection in the eye, or a growth going into the eye. It could also be there is something in the eye that got infected.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2016
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Bubbles or foam in the eye can be a sign of mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG,) but this year I have noticed one of my otherwise healthy chickens who has that in both eyes on very cold days. It goes away in a couple of hours, and she doesn't have it everyday. I tend to think that it may be something to do with her tear ducts or the freezing cold. If other respiratory symptoms are absent such as runny nose, rattly or wheezy breathing, cough or sneeze, or swelling around an eye, then I would watch it. If you see other symptoms, give her Tylan 50 1/4 ml orally twice a day for 5 days.
     
  5. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    Thank you for the info Eggcessive. I'll keep an eye on it. (No pun intended.)

    I'll go ahead and post a picture tomorrow morning after I do chores.
     
  6. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    Sorry for the slightly blurry pictures. The bubbles range from covering half of the eye to just barely being there. It has been very cold lately, (below 0 wind chills) but it supposed to warm up. Hopefully it will go away with the warmth.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Oxytetracycline in her water is another treatment for myoplasma, but using the Tylan 50 orally, she would be the only one to get the medication if she stays with the other chickens. I gave my chicken a round of Tylan when I first noticed the bubbles, since I am terrified of getting a respiratory disease in my flock, but it didn't seem to matter. You could also use Terramycin eye ointment or Vetericyn eye gel in her eyes. Here is a little to read about mycoplasma (MG) just to know what to look for:


    Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Synonyms: MG, chronic respiratory disease (CRD), infectious sinusitis, mycoplasmosis
    Species affected: chickens, turkeys, pigeons, ducks, peafowl, and passerine birds.
    Clinical signs: Clinical symptoms vary slightly between species. Infected adult chickens may show no outward signs if infection is uncomplicated. However, sticky, serous exudate from nostrils, foamy exudate in eyes, and swollen sinuses can occur, especially in broilers. The air sacs may become infected. Infected birds can develop respiratory rales and sneeze. Affected birds are often stunted and unthrifty (see Table 1).
    There are two forms of this disease in the turkey. With the "upper form" the birds have watery eyes and nostrils, the infraorbitals (just below the eye) become swollen, and the exudate becomes caseous and firm. The birds have respiratory rales and show unthriftiness.
    With the "lower form", infected turkeys develop airsacculitis. As with chickens, birds can show no outward signs if the infection is uncomplicated. Thus, the condition may go unnoticed until the birds are slaughtered and the typical legions are seen. Birds with airsacculitis are condemned.
    MG in chicken embryos can cause dwarfing, airsacculitis, and death.
    Transmission: MG can be spread to offspring through the egg. Most commercial breeding flocks, however, are MG-free. Introduction of infected replacement birds can introduce the disease to MG-negative flocks. MG can also be spread by using MG-contaminated equipment.
    Treatment: Outbreaks of MG can be controlled with the use of antibiotics. Erythromycin, tylosin, spectinomycin, and lincomycin all exhibit anti-mycoplasma activity and have given good results. Administration of most of these antibiotics can be by feed, water or injection. These are effective in reducing clinical disease. However, birds remain carriers for life.
    Prevention: Eradication is the best control of mycoplasma disease. The National Poultry Improvement Plan monitors all participating chicken and turkey breeder flocks.
     
  8. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    Oh dear. The bantam seemed to be getting better on her own (She's all clear today) so I didn't give her anything. However, I noticed another chicken had bubbly eyes and heard my almost four year old SLW had noisy breathing. (She sounds like a 3 year old with a runny nose.) She does not have eye bubbles or mucus. Should I treat it as @Eggcessive mentioned above? Also. if it is CRD do I need to report it to anyone? (I didn't realize this was something that could be "carried".)
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I would go ahead and treat them with either Tylan 50 injectable (given orally) 1/4 ml for bantams, 1/2 for smaller regular chickens, and 1 ml for over 5 pounds. If you want, you can purchase Tylan Soluble Powder 1 tsp. per gallon of water as long as they are drinking okay. Oxytetracycline is also commonly used in the water instead. Mycoplasma or CRD is fairly common, and chickens are carriers for life, but may recover. Your state vet or local extension agent could tell you how to get one tested. If one dies or you cull it, you can send it to the state vet, and they would tell you what disease they have with a necropsy. Secondary infections can make it more serious.
     

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