Chicken with Coccidiosis or Worms?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Melovechickens, Dec 18, 2017.

  1. Melovechickens

    Melovechickens In the Brooder

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    Hey guys! So I have a chicken that isn't doing well. She has lost a lot of weight and has had runny poop. No blood in it from what I've seen. She isn't acting lethargic and is about one year old. I have been told to use Corrid. I was wondering how you treat a chicken with SafeGuard (goat). Thanks!
     
  2. Melovechickens

    Melovechickens In the Brooder

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    Which one should I use? Corrid or SafeGuard? I don't want to spend a bunch of money to get a fecal float, but I don't know if she has coccidiosis or worms. What should I disinfect my coop with and should I treat my other birds with the SafeGuard or Corrid?
     
  3. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Crossing the Road

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    Can you take a fresh sample of poop to your vet for testing of worms and Coccidiosis?

    Safeguard (Fenbedazole) is a de-wormer. This should take care of most worms. Dosage is 1/4 ml per pound for 5 days in a row. Keep in mind there is an egg throw away period - generally that would be 14days after last dosage is administered (at least 19days all together - if you worry about drug residues, throw the eggs away for a longer period of time or research FARAD for timetables).

    Corid (Amprolium) is used to treat Coccidiosis. Dosage is 1 1/2 teaspoons Corid powder per gallon of water or 2 teaspoons of 9.6% Corid liquid per gallon of water.
    Give for 5-7 days - make sure this is the ONLY water available during that time period. Mix a fresh batch at least once a day. There is no egg withdrawal period for Corid.

    You could treat for both at the same time if you feel it is absolutely necessary. I have found not contraindications between giving Amprolium along with de-wormers, but I am not a vet, so it's always best to consult a medical professional when giving multiple medications.

    As always, once you finish a course of treatment, it's a good idea to offer poultry vitamins and probiotics for a few days to help restore the gut.

    Give your hen a good going over. Worms and Coccidiosis can both cause weight loss, but other illness and disease can also cause the same symptoms. Check her for lice/mites, see that the crop is emptying overnight, feel the abdomen for any bloat/swelling or feeling of fluid (reproductive and internal laying disorders are notorious for weight loss in laying hens), disease like Marek's can also cause wasting as well as poor nutrition.

    Keep her hydrated and eating the best you can. Sometimes a higher protein feed (chick starter or flock raiser) can make a difference. Other options would be to offer a little chopped egg or meat in addition to her normal feed.
     
    ChickenCanoe likes this.
  4. Melovechickens

    Melovechickens In the Brooder

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    For the SafeGuard you say per pound. Is that for food? I have the liquid SafeGuard for goats. How long do I treat her for with each and how often per day? Thanks!
     
  5. Melovechickens

    Melovechickens In the Brooder

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    Is it possible for me to add the liquid SafeGuard to her food and mash it up and she eats the mash? I feel like that would work better than giving it to them through their water.
     
  6. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Crossing the Road

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    You want to weigh each chicken that you are going to treat. So "per pound" would be the body weight of the chicken. Weighing your girl is the only way to provide the correct dosage ((For example: If your hen weighs 4lbs you would give her 1ml or cc of Safeguard everyday for 5days.))

    Safeguard would be administered orally to ensure she gets the proper dosage. If you try to mix it with food she may not consume all of the medication. From what I understand, Safeguard does not mix well with water either - it separates. Here's some very good information along with illustrations about how to administer medication orally https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...er-construction-check-back-for-updates.73335/
     
    EggSighted4Life likes this.
  7. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    Hi. :frow

    Sorry your girl is having trouble. :(

    I'm not sure what makes you think it's worms or cocci? Treating an ill bird for what they don't have can make them worse. I would spend the $15-18 at my vet, and get the fecal float done.

    Don't know what makes you think through feed is better than through water? (sorry I truly don't mean any ugliness). I do what the directions say. And don't treat just your ill bird, they all need to be treated if treating for worm or cocci.

    And if it was either worms or cocci, I would not spend my time disinfecting the coop. Worms are in the environment and cocci is in EVERY single chicken poo. And it true that out of the 9 types of cocci only 1 will present as blood in the stool. But even when I had chicks present with bloody feces, it definitely wasn't every single time even from the same chick.

    Some diagnostic question... how long has it been going on? How many birds in how much space with what kind of weather? What do you feed including treats and supplements? When was the last time she laid?

    Hope she feels better! :fl
     
    ChickenCanoe likes this.
  8. Melovechickens

    Melovechickens In the Brooder

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    It's been going on for like 3 months of watery poo and no laying. She molted during this time though. Just yesterday I noticed she was losing weight and had lost a lot of it. I have three birds in a 15 square foot coop and a 72 square foot run. I feed organic laying pellets from Atwoods and I almost always feed mealworms for treats except for the occasional strawberry or chunk of cheese. She hasn't laid for around 3 months.
     
  9. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Free Ranging

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    I have to side with @Wyorp Rock and @EggSighted4Life.
    Get a fecal sample (from her) tested to see what she is dealing with rather than guess about what you're treating.
    A one year old bird that has been on your property all this time shouldn't have an issue with coccidia.
    It could be worms or something else.
    I had an issue with one of my flocks that had a lot of diarrhea and considered roundworms a possibility. Rather than treat for worms, I took a fecal sample to the vet to be read. That was a smart move.
    They had no worms but a severe clostridial bacteria infection. The vet gave me tetracycline which cured the birds and haven't had an issue since.
    Treating for worms would have been unnecessary and prolonged the problem.
     
    Wyorp Rock and EggSighted4Life like this.
  10. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    OK, good answers. What is the protein % on your layer feed?

    Can you post a pic of the poo? What color is it?

    Since she has molted, the not laying is very likely normal. Good that you don't feed much low nutrient treats! :thumbsup Meal worms are a little high in fat but a good source of protein when done on correct amount. And protein things CAN help recover from molt much easier since feathers are made of 90% protein (or the amino acids it contains). Molting is a very stressful time on the chickens body. It changes their behavior completely and can be a time when any illness will take advantage of their likely lowered immune system.

    I'm not saying it isn't cocci or worms, because both of those will also take advantage when they can... but it doesn't sound like cocci to me. Are you able to post a pic of the bird?
     

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