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Chicken won't open her eye...PLEASE HELP

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by bfeusner, Oct 14, 2009.

  1. bfeusner

    bfeusner Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 14, 2009
    Louisville, KY
    I recently had two chickens (Black Australope Rooster & Barred Rock Hen) pass away...I noticed a couple days prior to their passing that one of the roosters eyes was not open and looked like it was "stuck" closed. Well now that both of the have died I just noticed today that another one of my Barred Rock Hens has the same problem with her eye! What could the problem be? Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions? This is my first time keeping chickens and I dont want to see all of them die! PLEASE HELP!
     
  2. bfeusner

    bfeusner Out Of The Brooder

    30
    1
    24
    Oct 14, 2009
    Louisville, KY
    The most recent hen that I noticed this in was having no other noticeable problems and was eating and drinking fine and appeared very active!
     
  3. bfeusner

    bfeusner Out Of The Brooder

    30
    1
    24
    Oct 14, 2009
    Louisville, KY
    I just noticed that this same chicken now has a runny nose and watery eyes! WHAT DO I DO? I don't want this to spread to the rest of my flock! PLEASE HELP ASAP!
     
  4. GaNewChick

    GaNewChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2009
    McDonough, Ga.
    Have you separated it from the rest? I wish I could help you more ~ hopefully someone will be along soon.

    Try this link:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=239577

    I did find this under a search ~ maybe this will help.

    From Mississippi State University website-

    Infectious Coryza

    Infectious coryza is a specific respiratory disease in chickens that occurs most often in semi-mature or adult birds. Infection may result in a slow-spreading, chronic disease that affects only a small number of birds at one time, or in a rapid spreading disease with a higher percentage of birds being affected. The occurrence of infectious coryza is not widespread and the incidence is relatively low.

    The disease is caused by a bacterium known as Hemophilus gallinarum. Outbreaks usually result from the introduction of infected or carrier birds into a flock. Transmission of the infection occurs by direct contact, airborne infection by dust or respiratory discharge droplets and drinking water contaminated by infective nasal exudate. Susceptible birds usually develop symptoms within three days after exposure to the disease. Recovered individuals may appear normal but remain carriers of the organism for long periods. Once a flock is infected, all birds must be considered as carriers.

    The most characteristic symptoms of infectious coryza include edematous swelling of the face around the eyes and wattles, nasal discharge and swollen sinuses. Watery discharge from the eyes frequently results in the lids adhering together. Vision may be affected because of the swelling. The disease results in a decrease in feed and water consumption and an increase in the number of cull birds. An adverse effect on egg production usually occurs in proportion to the number of affected birds.

    Diagnosis can be confirmed only by isolation and identification of the causative organism. The organism, Hemophilus gallinarum, is extremely fastidious and often difficult to isolate.

    Prevention is the only sound approach in controlling infectious coryza. It usually can be prevented by management programs that eliminate contact between susceptible and infected birds. It requires only separating affected or carrier birds from the susceptible population. In order to prevent the infection, introduce started or adult birds only from sources known to be free of the infection. If infection occurs, complete depopulation followed by thorough cleaning/disinfecting is the only means for eliminating the disease.

    A number of drugs are effective for treating the symptoms of the disease although the disease is never completely eliminated. Sulfadimethoxine or sulfathiazole in the feed or water or erythromycin administered in the drinking water can reduce the symptoms of this disease.​
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2009

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