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Chicken worms: How to ID and is the bird safe to eat

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by acastlechicken, Feb 18, 2017.

  1. acastlechicken

    acastlechicken New Egg

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    Feb 18, 2017
    Hi, I'm not sure whether or not my chickens have worms, one of the symptoms I've heard of is that the eggs come out with poop on them, which has been happening with my flock. So, how can I determine if they have worms or not?

    Also, is it safe for people to eat chickens with worms? I was already planning on harvesting the flock here in a month or two but if they have worms I would almost rather harvest them now than deworm them, simply due to cost.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2017
  2. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    The cost of deworming is minimal. Up to you. If you want to know for sure get a vet to do a fecal float for you.
     
  3. acastlechicken

    acastlechicken New Egg

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    I really can't afford any vet costs or anything right now, which is why I'm asking. They arent showing any real symptoms: solid poo, worm free poo, worm free eggs,etc.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2017
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    That is probably just something that an individual chicken is doing--I 've had a couple that have done that, and I don't think it has anything to do with worms. However, you can use SafeGuard equine paste or goat wormer to worm your dhickens.
     
  5. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    You should always deworm your flock periodically with a broad spectrum dewormer, at least every six months or so. It won't hurt them. There is a withdrawal period for egg and meat consumption.
     
  6. rebrascora

    rebrascora Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are you in the southern hemisphere? If not then it is an unusual time to harvest old layers as you have kept them through the unproductive winter months and they should be coming back into lay now.
    Personally I have not used a chemical wormer on my chickens for the past 4 years. I check the gut of any that die or I butcher and whilst I find the odd one occasionally, I think it would be unreasonable to expect none considering the environment they live in. If I start seeing increased levels of worms in butchered birds then I would consider getting a faecal float done on my laying birds and worm as necessary. I don't think worms in the gut pose a problem to harvesting the meat. As with anything to do with chickens, thorough cooking is important of course.
    If you are still intending to butcher them within the next couple of months or so, I would not worm them and I personally don't believe that poopy eggs are necessarily a sign of worms
     
  7. acastlechicken

    acastlechicken New Egg

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    I am not located in the southern hemisphere, but I am considering harvesting already for various reasons. From what I've been able to find, I don't believe they have worms. And considering that both waste and eggs come out of the Vent, poopy eggs shouldnt be a problem... the person I heard that from may not not have realized that. Thanks everyone!
     
  8. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    I have to disagree whole heartedly with this statement!

    Worms and other organisms build immunity to these things that get over used! Do not use it unless you need to. Plus a "broad spectrum" might not target your area of need.

    I have NEVER wormed my chickens in 6 years or felt the need to.

    I heard that poopy eggs meant worms recently and I say hog wash! I checked my girls... some of the fluffier girls get a dingle berry that holds on and fresh poo coats it and eggs get laid before the fresh poo has dried completely. and smears a little on the way past.

    A fecal float at the vet is $15 and tell you which worms to treat for.

    Also, having worms doesn't make your eggs or meat unsafe. If you are processing yourself.... you can cut open the intestines and do a visual inspection for worms as many do, just so they know if they need to treat the rest of the flock not so they don't eat it.

    Some worm load is completely natural! The problem comes when there is an over growth... which can be avoided by proper maintenance of your coop/run/pasture and not over crowding. [​IMG]

    Of course if your flock is showing symptoms.... yes you need to pursue as it is detrimental to their health.

    Best wishes!
     
    2 people like this.
  9. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Well, disagree away. Capillary worms do not appear in droppings, and by the time the birds show symptoms of a capillary worm infestation, it is too late in most cases, because they conceal symptoms until they can't anymore. Capillary worms kill.

    And the worms do not develop immunity if you rotate dewormers.

    And our flock is not over crowded, they free range, and at night they are in a large building, they have plenty of room. Worms and worm eggs are in the ground, and some can be contracted by the bird eating earthworms, which are the host for other parasites, or they just pick them up from pecking the ground. Worms have nothing to do with overcrowding or coop maintenance. .

    Also, it depends on where you are, and what vet you go to, that determines the cost. It is not $15.00 everywhere. As I said before, if you want to be sure, you can always do a fecal float. If you're going to eat the birds anyway, it really doesn't make much difference, as the worms won't be in the meat of the bird.

    This is not to say that all birds will have worms, but in some areas, depending on climate, soil, and other factors, they probably will. Internal and external parasites weaken the bird and can cause all kinds of other problems, if they are not monitored and controlled.

    I
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2017
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    My vet told me that many animals can tolerate normal worms, but that an animal that is immune-compromised will have a tougher time fighting off worms. If one sees a lot of poultry diseases in the flock, there may be a bigger need to deworm. Having a fecal test done occasionally from several fresh droppings might help, just to be aware of what is going on. Fecal floats can really vary in price; mines charges around $35 in a small town. Some choose to worm whether having a fecal done or not. If your chickens are behaving normally without problems, it might not be that important. If one does, it helps to look inside the gut for the presence of worms. Everyone is entitled to do what they feel is best, and that is what this forum is about--to give our opinions, and let the people make up their own minds.
     
    1 person likes this.

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