Chickens are dying!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Frady’s Chicken Lady, Apr 6, 2018.

  1. Frady’s Chicken Lady

    Frady’s Chicken Lady In the Brooder

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    Dec 30, 2017
    I have been a chicken owner for several years now with a flock of anywhere from 20-50 birds. Every year a few birds die for no apparent reason. However I have had 4 birds die recently within about six weeks. 2 were just found dead in the coop and 2 had been staying away from the flock so I caught them and within a day they were dead. Has anybody got any answers? I’m wondering if this is Mereks or coccidosis?? Not sure if the spelling is correct.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Apr 3, 2011
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    It would be good to know the ages and the symptoms you were seeing before the chickens got sick or died. The best way to know if there is a disease going through a flock is to get a necropsy performed by sending in a refrigerated body to your state vet or poultry lab.
     
  3. Frady’s Chicken Lady

    Frady’s Chicken Lady In the Brooder

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    0
    10
    Dec 30, 2017
    The ages vary anywhere from 6 months to 2 years. One of these had no symptoms. Just was found dead in the coop. The other 2 stayed away from the flock and then was found dead. One was found in the coop and the other I had placed in a cage to try to help and died before the end of the day.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Mareks usually causes imbalance, weakness in a leg or wing, or a twisted neck. Poor immunity is common. There can be other signs. A necropsy by the state vet or a poultry lab would be the best way to test for it. Send a fresh refrigerated body on ice packs. Here is some contact information on state vets:
    http://www.metzerfarms.com/PoultryLabs.cfm

    Coccidiosis causes runny poops, sometimes bloody or orange gel, standing around hunched or puffed up, lethargy or sleepiness, poor feeding, and ruffled feathers. A fecal test can be done on droppings by a local vet to confirm that. Corid powder or liquid can be added to the water for 5-7 says to treat all chickens. It is more common in young chickens or in older birds with poor immunity.

    In chickens 2 and over, reproductive problems are common. Those include internal laying, egg yolk peritonitis, and ascites or water belly.

    During a very cold winter, there can be unusual losses if chickens are somewhat weak.
     

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