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Chickens attacked

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ntankovich, Mar 10, 2015.

  1. ntankovich

    ntankovich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 8, 2013
    Last night at about 1 am I woke up to the sound of one chicken making a huge commotion. When I ran out six were huddled in the run and one was dead at the opening of the coop door. Blood everywhere. My husband and I pryed open the top because they would not budge and carried them all inside one by one. They're currently downstairs in a dog cage. It appears they all have minor abrasions but one has major injuries. Her back near her til looks as though all the feathers are gone and top layers of skin in small areas gone. I can see this small cartilage like piece coming from the end of her tail. Up near her neck and right wing there's also a wound that appears to be a bit more deep. She's no longer bleeding and I have tried putting neosporin on some of the wounds.
    Now, what do I do? Is there any hope? I of course ask this well aware you can't see the inquiries. I may be able to post a pic later after they've rested a while.
    Thanks in advance. We're all so sad:(
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    To start, I'd flush the wound with a saline solution and then betadine or any organic iodine. Then coat with an eye type triple antibiotic ointment. The eye type melts at body temperature and will get deep in the wound.

    You can use hydrogen peroxide the first day to replace the iodine but after that, it inhibits healing. Iodine won't kill new cells.

    Do the above treatment twice a day.

    She may also benefit from an antibiotic to ward off bacteria from the bite.

    Do you know what the predator was?
     
  3. ntankovich

    ntankovich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have no clue. We
     
  4. ntankovich

    ntankovich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Whoops. We have everything up here. Coyotes, raccoons, etc
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    What time of the day did it happen?
     
  6. ntankovich

    ntankovich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Overnight. I just happened to wake up and heard them outside. Maybe 1am?
     
  7. ntankovich

    ntankovich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The weird thing is the one that died had its throat slit. Maybe a claw got it?
     
  8. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Last edited: Mar 10, 2015
  9. ntankovich

    ntankovich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I live in Ohio. I think raccoon is likely. I know it sounds like a stupid question but do I need to worry about rabies?
    I have dogs but they weren't out. There are coyotes around here too.
    The back board of the coop has warped a bit so I think that's where it got through a bit.
     
  10. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I wouldn't worry about rabies.
    I've had a lot of chickens taken by raccoons, dogs, opossum and mink over the years and never had an issue with rabies.

    Be very careful of any small opening. Raccoons pulled the siding off of one building last year and killed all the birds therein.
    Shortly thereafter, mink killed $3000 worth of chickens. Our family hadn't had an issue with mink in almost 150 years of poultry keeping. Mink and weasels can get into a 1" opening.
    Anything larger than 1/4" should be covered with hardware cloth or equally stout covering.
     

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