Chickens haven't layed since dog attack

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Mussamatt, Dec 2, 2016.

  1. Mussamatt

    Mussamatt Out Of The Brooder

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    In July we had the misfortune of a dog attack. Since then egg production has diminished down to nothing. At first I chalked it up to stress. Then I added replacements and felt that was again more stress. Now the new pullets have started laying some. I haven't had a worming program. In October I started dosing black walnut extract to their water and pumpkin season hit. I've read a bunch and was hoping the combination might get them laying again. I haven't seen any worms in stools, I've been watching for a while. I've read all the naysayers regarding ineffectiveness of pumpkins, so please let's not get into that. My questions are 1) how should I proceed 2) how long can a chicken go without laying and begin again 3) besides taking a stool to the vet, what are the signs of a worm infestion 4) suggestions other than worms for loss of egg production?
     
  2. Mussamatt

    Mussamatt Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 15, 2014
    The hens all appear normal. Stools are well formed for the most part. The culture has changed in that they tend to stay in the coop more or don't venture nearly as far from it when released. Occasional wet butt, but nothing that lasts.
     
  3. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    You mentioned it, so I will touch on the subject......Zero need for the Black walnut or Pumpkin seeds.....Pumpkin as a snack.....

    Anyways......Chickens do not need wormer unless you see worms in the stools.......I have never wormed a Chicken......

    Location would help....Age of Birds......Feed....Lots of factors to a drop in Egg production.....


    Cheers!
     
  4. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    Hi, welcome to BYC! [​IMG]

    I have never wormed or felt the need to yet.

    Yes, your original drop was due to stress. Now the weather has changed as well. Which decreases light and therefor laying.

    You don't mention the age of the girls we are taking about. Are you supplementing light? What do you feed?

    You could still have predator load that you haven't yet realized like nighttime visitors.

    Also, maybe they are hiding a nest from you?

    I had one girl start laying at 24 weeks. Laid good while I let her nest stay hidden. Moved the nest added more birds, weather changed, haven't seen an egg from her since about 30 weeks. And now we are talking 4 months of no eggs from my barred rock while everyone else is coming along! [​IMG]
     
  5. Mussamatt

    Mussamatt Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 15, 2014
    Most of them are about a year old. They aren't laying in a hidden nest. I've searched. I added supplemental light. I have about 17 over a year old. They used to lay over a dozen a day. Located in south east Michigan. Unlikely nighttime predators. I've built the coop like a fortress, or so I've been told.
     
  6. Mussamatt

    Mussamatt Out Of The Brooder

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    Feed consists of 18% organic pellets, Scratch, BOSS, kefir, kitchen scraps. Of course, not all at once.
     
  7. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    When you added your supplemental lighting did you do it all at once or incrementally?

    Also if they are over one year old and this is their second winter they may be molting...

    Do you offer oyster shell on the side?
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Welcome to BYC!

    How long since the attacks and additions?
    How old are the younger birds?

    You've searched for a hidden nest.....but...have you confined them to the coop and run for a week to be sure they are not laying?
    Free range birds sometimes need to be 'trained'(or re-trained) to lay in the coop nests, especially new layers. Leaving them locked in the coop for 3-4 days (or longer) can help 'home' them to lay in the coop nests. Fake eggs/golf balls in the nests can help 'show' them were to lay. They can be confined to coop 24/7 for a few days to a week, or confine them at least until mid to late afternoon. You help them create a new habit and they will usually stick with it. ..at least for a good while, then repeat as necessary.

    Molting is certainly a possibility.....and the questions about lighting and coop size are good ones.

    The only worms you will see in poop are round worms and maybe tape worms.
    A fecal float, done by someone who knows how and will give good info on types and counts,
    would be needed to determine if any other parasites are the issue.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2016
  9. Mussamatt

    Mussamatt Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 15, 2014
    I added supplemental incrementally. It's been in use since the days began to shorten.
    Attack in July.
    New pullets in August.
    Birds have been confined to be sure of no hidden nests.
    Birds have all molted.
    Coop is designed for 42 birds by square footage.
    Oyster shells available.
    This is my fourth year keeping chickens.
    None are 2 yrs old yet.
    Maybe it's time to find a vet that will float chicken poop. Mine doesn't.
     
  10. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    Contact a livestock vet......They will do it......


    Cheers!
     

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