Chickens look like their faces have been stung by bees....all lumpy.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by hillbillyway, Aug 29, 2013.

  1. hillbillyway

    hillbillyway Out Of The Brooder

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    One of my chickens looks like it has been stung by bees or something. All around head all swollen and lumpy, eyes all swollen. Looks like a person whos got into a bees nest and got stung in the face. Any ideas???? Have had chickens for long time and never had this happen. Its not isolated to one eye, its not discolored. Can take pics if needed.....
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Pictures might help. Have you done a search on fowlpox?
     
  3. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Please get some pictures.
     
  4. hillbillyway

    hillbillyway Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 13, 2008
    Charleston, WV
    [​IMG]

    After reading about fowlpox online I have to think this is what I am facing. With the huge amount of rain in my area we have had an explosion of mosquitos. Nasty lil buggars!!!!! It does seem to have happened quickly though.......
     
  5. Sassafras

    Sassafras Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That poor chicken! I have never heard of fowlpox but I am sure gonna look it up now. Good luck.
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Casportpony is going through the same thing except she is also dealing with wet pox...wet pox is dangerous, not like dry pox. Here's her link with pics:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/818895/wet-and-dry-fowl-pox-pictures
     
  7. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Oh yes, thats fowl pox! Heres some information on it, though you've probably found some info already.

    Fowl Pox is a disease caused by a virus (its not related to Chicken Pox in humans). Fowl Pox does not have a treatment, and runs its course in about three weeks. It isn't usually deadly in the dry form, which your bird appears to have. However, it can be deadly if it progresses to the wet form, which causes lesions and scabs in the throat as well.

    Fowl Pox is quite contagious, so keep infected birds isolated from other birds. The main carriers of Fowl Pox are mosiquitoes, flies, and other flying insects. To reduce the spread of the disease, treat your chicken area for flying insects. This will eliminate most of the carriers.

    Keep infected birds as stress-free as possible to prevent a secondary bacterial infection. Give electrolytes and probiotics, and make sure that they eat and drink. You might want to put him on a course of antibiotics. Oxytetracycline like Duramycin, Terramycin, and Tetroxy HCA-280 is a good antibiotic, as it is broad-spectrum. Make sure that you don't give probiotics, yogurt, apple cider vinegar, or other dairy products while using antibiotics, as they will interfere with the success of the antibiotics.

    To make your birds more comfortable, mix together some vaseline with sulphur (I believe that sulphur can be found at garden stores, but I'm not sure). Put this mixture on the scabs, and they will soften so that you can remove them. Without the scabs, he will be able to see to eat and drink, and the sulphur will help repel flies.

    Birds that recover from Fowl Pox will be immune, but can still pass the disease to others. To prevent Fowl Pox in the future, you might want to vaccinate. The Fowl Pox vaccine is relatively easy to find, and easy to give. You can buy it at http://www.twincitypoultrysupplies....d34279a8d4fc77a34e81&keyword=fowl+pox+vaccine.

    Hope this helps!
     

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