Chicken's May Have Disease - Need Advice

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Valley Farmer, Oct 26, 2013.

  1. Valley Farmer

    Valley Farmer Out Of The Brooder

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    On Wednesday afternoon we noticed our rooster and one hen where not quite their usual selves and seemed rather lethargic (really they didn't even want to move much). On the following day we found that the hen had died and all the other hens were suddenly barely moving and would just stand there with their eye's shut. On top of this they all have very watery poo, mixed with what seems like blood and the tips of their combs are a black to dark purplish in color. We did a search online and it seems like they could have coccidiosis, but we're not 100% sure. I picked up some corid after work yesterday and have been mixing a teaspoon of the powder to a gallon of water, but haven't seen much results as of today (approx. 24hrs later). None of them are eating or drinking very much either. I'm especially concerned about our rooster "Red Beard" who seems a bit worse than the hens. Today he hardly moved and just stood with his eye's closed. We've grown a bit attached to him and he just survived a likely fox attack (while free ranging ~3wks ago). His feathers were all over the yard in piles and we thought for sure he was gone. Surprisingly, 36hrs later he appeared! We live in the country so how he survived is a miracle. He was bitten, but we got some antibiotics, sprayed the wound with vetericyn and he bounced right back to his old self. After all that it would be horrible to loose the poor guy now or any of the others for that matter. Any thought's or ideas would greatly be appreciated.
     
  2. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    How old are the birds being affected? If older than a year of age, Coccidiosis is unlikely, though the blood in the droppings is an obvious sign. I'd continue treating them with Corid, but for future reference, the Corid powder dosage is 1.5 teaspoons per gallon, not 1. Also, I would purchase a broad-spectrum wormer, like Valbazen, SafeGuard, or the Worminator (flubendazole) and worm them. You can usually find wormers at a livestock supply store, and you can order the Worminator online from here: http://www.twincitypoultrysupplies.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=584 Two other wormers used often are Wazine and Ivermectin, but they don't work well and I do not recommend using them.

    Check the birds for mites/lice, too, as they can cause lethargy. Look on the feathers and skin near the vent, under the wings, beneath the neck feathers, and at the base of the tail for moving black or red specks (mites), yellowish blobs (lice), or whitish eggs on the feather shafts (lice eggs). If you see any, dust the birds with 5% Sevin dust or poultry dust and clean out the coop.

    The darkening of the comb is typically a sign of heart problems or difficulty breathing. Do the sick birds cough, sneeze, or have gurgly/rattly breathing? If so, then they probably have a respiratory disease, and a severe one at that. To treat a respiratory disease, I would get either Tylan50 injectable or the powdered version of Tylan50. The injectable works faster, but it wouldn't be very efficient to inject a large flock. The injectable Tylan50 dosage is 1cc for large fowl, .5ccs for bantams, injected into one side of the breast once daily for 5 days. Alternate the side of the breast that you inject into, and use a small needle to avoid irritating the injection site too much. Improvement should be seen after 1-3 days. I'm not sure about the powdered Tylan50 dosage, but I'm sure you could find it by searching the Internet or BYC.

    Keep in mind, though, that antibiotics will not work against a viral respiratory disease--they will only help prevent secondary infection.

    Other than that, I'm not sure what else your chickens could have. The other two diseases that I know of that can cause bloody droppings are: campylobacteriosis and Exotic Newcastle Disease. Diseases causing discoloration of the comb are: Lymphoid Leukosis, Chronic Respiratory disease, bluecomb, paratyphoid, tuberculosis,and spirochetosis.
     
  3. Valley Farmer

    Valley Farmer Out Of The Brooder

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    They are 7 months old. We're continuing with the Corid (been 24hrs) and have increased the ratio to 1.5 teaspoons, at your suggestion and have added "sav-a-chick" electrolyte/vitamin supplement (hopefully it's ok to mix the two). It's amazing how much conflicting info there is on the proper amount of corid to mix. We were using 1 tsp to a gallon, as suggested in Dr. Brown's article. Where did you find out to use 1.5? Most other sources list .5 and 1, while one even said 1-1.5 tablespoons (these were all for the powder and not the liquid). Doesn't appear to be respiratory related, based what I've seen and heard from them. Actually today we noticed some improvement in the hens, though they were still a bit lethargic. The rooster seemed worse, but toward evening he suddenly perked up a bit and starting eating an apple I gave him. I checked them for lice/mites and did see a few, which I'd like to take care of immediately. Little hesitant to use Seven though. Would DE work quick enough or is there some other method? Thanks for your help!
     
  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Most sources do say to give one half or one teaspoon of powdered Corid. However, a BYC member on here, Casportpony, has mathematically figured out the correct dosage instead of relying on the normal recommendations. She found that 1.5 is actually right.
     
  5. Valley Farmer

    Valley Farmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for that info, we certainly want to use the correct amount. One other thing I forgot to add is that they all still have very watery poo. I haven't seen any with blood today and it's more brown with white now. So maybe that's a good sign.
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    The amount of Corid--a teaspoonful or 1 1/2 is not all that critical. I prefer to tell people to use the liquid Corid, since 2 tsp seems to be the right amount. Some strains of coccidia can be especially bad, especially the kinds causng blood in the stools. Most people wait until after Corid treatment to give vitamins and probiotics. Mixing anything extra into the water isn't usually recommended. A second 1/2 dose round of Corid can be done if they are very sick.
     
  7. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    X2 whether you use 1 or 1.5 tsp for Corid powder,makes no difference.
     
  8. sepaditty1

    sepaditty1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If I could go back in time 1 week here's what I would do. Grab my very sick, very. Dehydrated rooster and hand feed him droppers of the Corid water. He was so far out of it that he didn't get what he needed out of the waterer & we lost him.and one other. Thankfuully the rest are ok. So grateful for all the help from people on BYC.

    Good luck with your flock.
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Very good point--if the chicken is too ill to drink the Corid, they must be fed it any way possible, mixed with the food, syringe-fed, or tube fed.
     
  10. Valley Farmer

    Valley Farmer Out Of The Brooder

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    I did end up using an eye dropper to get some water into the rooster previously, but he's drinking on his own again. Also picked up both Diatomaceous Earth and Poultry Protector. Anyone have any experience with either and how well they perform? I plan on treating the chicken's with the Protector and sprinkling the DE around the coop. On another note, the rooster is still moving very little and almost always just standing with his eye's shut. They all still have watery poo and they've been on the corid for about 3 days now. From what I've read about cocci, it was probably on day 4 or 5 that the signs began and since they've made it past day 6 or 7 they should be immune to that strain now. Is this typically the case? I was hoping I'd see more improvement by this point, though we certainly have seen some. Thanks again for all the help!
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2013

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