Chickens not laying

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Manya Adams, Jan 29, 2015.

  1. Manya Adams

    Manya Adams New Egg

    1
    0
    7
    Sep 23, 2014
    What are some of the things one could do when your chickens stop laying? They are three years old and have been good layers in the past. We got only two eggs from our three hens in the last month or more.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2015
  2. Indoroowet

    Indoroowet Out Of The Brooder

    69
    5
    49
    Oct 9, 2014
    Nothern Utah
    Same here, no *answer* from me ...
    The only thing changed is the temperature has not been as cold as before.
    Water and feeding supply same and it seems they eat and drink the same amount.
    They are NOT molting.
    They seems to behave normally.

    Now no eggs for 4 days.
    Before 2-3 eggs a day from 3 hens.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2015
  3. krista74

    krista74 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,576
    166
    158
    Jun 4, 2014
    Victoria, Australia.
    Some of the things that could potentially affect egg laying are:-

    * Moulting - Egg laying normally ceases during and after moulting. Provide extra protein in their diets by feeding grower's pellets rather than layer's pellets, and up the meaty treats such as mealworms, meat and cooked egg.

    * Poor Nutrition - If a hen does not get adequate nutrition, she can have poor egg quality or cease laying. Provide free access to a properly formulated layers pellet with oyster shell/grit on the side.

    * Water - Ensure that water never runs dry, and install multiple feed and water stations so that birds lower in the pecking order can still access it as desired

    * Illness - Check for signs of respiratory illness, egg binding and egg peritonitis, and seek vet treatment as appropriate

    * Internal Parasites - Worm and dust your birds on a regular basis to protect them, rather than let them become infested and have to treat them at the height of illness.

    * Hygiene - A healthy bird is a happy bird, so make sure all nest boxes, coops and runs are clean and free from poop build-up. Also check nests and coops for red mites and treat as required if present

    * Weather - Extremes of heat will often put a stop to egg laying. Ensure there is plenty of water and shade available to your birds. If possible, allow free-ranging so that they can seek out cool spots to rest.

    * Stress - A threat or attack from predators, a new person or animal near the coop, a move from one coop to another, a move to a new home altogether, the addition of (or removal of) a member of the flock, a thunder storm....anything that causes stress to your birds can affect laying, and only time to deal with the impact of that stress will bring a return to egg-laying

    * Age - Older birds will, inevitably, cease laying at some point. Dealing with this is a personal decision - options being to keep non-productive birds as pets, re-home them or cull them out.

    That's about all I can think of at the moment!

    Good luck!

    - Krista
     
  4. Indoroowet

    Indoroowet Out Of The Brooder

    69
    5
    49
    Oct 9, 2014
    Nothern Utah
    Update ...
    Before, I mentioned, the hens were not molting !

    Today I have to say: They are !!

    The coop and the back yard is scattered full of feathers ...
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2015
  5. krista74

    krista74 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,576
    166
    158
    Jun 4, 2014
    Victoria, Australia.
    [​IMG]

    I guess their bodies knew what was coming before you did!

    Moulting definitely explains the slow down in egg production.

    I have a couple of hens moulting at the moment and the place looks like I'm running a secret pillow factory!

    - Krista
     
  6. kurczaki

    kurczaki Out Of The Brooder

    22
    1
    37
    Feb 4, 2015
    I have 3 girls. 2 of them were molting in October and November. I had no eggs from them until January. The other one was molting just for 4 weeks in December and the egg production slowed down but she never stopped. Stress is an important factor as well.
     
  7. crazgypsyblond

    crazgypsyblond Out Of The Brooder

    13
    0
    29
    Mar 12, 2013
    None of my twenty hens are laying. I'm in PA and think it has to do with the weather, last winter though it was colder and they still were laying a few a year. They're all two years old I have Rhode island red, easter eggers (who lay when they want anyway but last winter I had at least four pink eggs a week and several blue a day), barred rocks. I give them organic feed and they're get a healthy dose of scraps several pounds a week.
     
  8. kurczaki

    kurczaki Out Of The Brooder

    22
    1
    37
    Feb 4, 2015
    Do you use the light in the coop? They need I believe 14 hours of day light in order to lay eggs.
     
  9. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Most chickens past their first year or so will stop laying in the winter due to shorter days. Laying usually stops with the fall molt and picks up again once the days start getting longer in the spring. You can add a light to lengthen their day and encourage continued laying through the winter. Or you can let their bodies take a break as nature intended. If egg production is your main focus then definitely add lighting if you want to see more eggs during the winter months.
     
  10. Indoroowet

    Indoroowet Out Of The Brooder

    69
    5
    49
    Oct 9, 2014
    Nothern Utah
    I was concerned, because they (all 3 of them) stopped all of a sudden and then only a few days later they started to molt really *good* !
    They used to lay eggs between 2 and 3 a day. (more like 3 a day ...)

    Somebody mentioned *stress*.
    What could be symptoms of stress ?

    For info:
    - 3 hens (two white ones, one brown one, no idea what kind ... )
    --- they look healthy - clean looking - wattles and combs are soft and bright coloured - legs look brown/yellowish.
    - Coop to sleep in = 4 x 5 foot - No heat/extra light - ventilation 3 sq foot opening - automatic door
    --- Base of coop = PDQ on bottom, then a 3 inch layer of wood shavings and then a 4 inch layer of wheat straw.
    - Run = 5 x 25 foot.
    --- Open run is covered with clear plastic (3/4 of run area), so they have a dry area to move around in. Dry area of run covered with wheat straw.
    - Space under coop for shade and food and water in same area.
    --- food is pellets as suggested by local (IFA) farm store.
    --- water supply automatic - heated to stay above 45 degrees and circulated and filtered (as in aquarium)

    Each morning, I check and clean their area (somewhat).
    Once a month, I do a thorough cleaning.
    Talk to them (I think, I can speak *chicken* now -- the grand kids said so !),
    and at the run door, I pick them up and *pet* them (they seem to like that, because they jump on me).
    Also, after *our dinner*, I go check again and give them food scraps which disappear within minutes !!
    In the summer months, when the grand kids are with us, the hens get to use the rest of the fenced yard.
    I clipped their wings as suggested (we have a fenced yard with a 6 foot high fence, where the hens are).
    When this happens, the hens follow the kids all over and stay with them within a few feet !
    So ... , I do not think they are under *stress*.
    Located in northern Utah.

    Have I missed something ?
    Thanks !
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by