chickens pecking other chickens

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by lionpearl10, Dec 15, 2008.

  1. lionpearl10

    lionpearl10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2008
    I noticed a few days ago one of my chickens had feathers off her back near her rump. One chicken in particular is pecking her. I have read about the cannabilism, she does have some red open areas where they can see it . I read put blue food coloring and vinegar in the water. When we put her down they all had to check it out and peck it. Then they stopped.We are both working tom. and I plan to put her in a dog crate it the garage so she can heal. Is this a common problem? Will she be all right them being social animals? Has anyone had success with curbing this problem? My boyfriend says be like a farmer and kill her I don't want to do that. Help ! Need some advice! Thanks. [email protected]
     
  2. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    What breed are they? How old?

    How many? How much space do they have?

    What are you feeding?

    All these things (and more) contribute to pecking issues.
     
  3. lionpearl10

    lionpearl10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2008
    we have rhode island reds, 1 rooster, 5 hens. they are about 8 months old, it is a guess. I feed them layer food. they also love grapes and the grass and all that. I am in new england and was keeping the light on so we would get eggs and read this could cause a problem. I have noticed her chasing particular chickens away from her today. I am going to just let the natural light do it. I really feel a 6 by 8 foot coop is big enough. we also just went through an ice storm, didn't have electricity for almost 4 days and were using a generator which was kind of close to them, only place to put it. Not to mention the sounds of all the trees ripping and cracking that night, very eerie. My rooster practically jumped out of his skin when ice hit the roof the next day so I can only imagine that they were stressed. I should seperate her though. Thanks. [email protected]
     
  4. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Seperate her until she's healed. Too much light and being cooped up (pardon the pun) as the result of bad weather can lead to pecking issues, as can other stresses.
    Once she's healed and ready to be put back in with the flock, do so at night when the others are roosting.
    If they start to peck her again, get yourself some blu-kote or (my favorite) pine tar at the tractor supply store, farmer's co-op, etc. Apply it on the hen in the area where the others have been picking. They won't like the taste and won't want to peck and taste it again.
    It's much easier to identify the cause of the stress if you can and deal with that.
     
  5. lionpearl10

    lionpearl10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2008
    thanks for the tips, sound good, I should just go get that pine tar the next chance I get. I could be wrong but felt it was a good sign that she was chasing the one chicken I assume who started pecking.
     
  6. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Nov 9, 2007
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    Quote:Sometimes the peckee will always be low in the pecking order and always submit. Other times it's like they get tired of always being picked on and decide to fight back.
    Just so you know, pine tar says right on the label that it's not for internal consumption. Don't worry about it, they don't actually swallow enough to harm them.
     
  7. lionpearl10

    lionpearl10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2008
    OK thanks. Is that one of your unconventional ways? I read your page on roology and found it quite interesting. I think I have a pretty good rooster, he seems to respect me but do have that little cautious side that keeps my eye on him, they do have those awfully long claws, lol. He seems to let his girls eat first and all that stuff. I watch him scanning to check for danger and he will let out a very loud crow if he sees something.
     
  8. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
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    I have tons - and I do mean tons - of time to watch and interact with my chickens. I also turn to my fiance' for advice. His family was raising chickens before I was even born. The folks on BYC have been very helpful as well.
    I also like to research. When I had a problem with the others picking on my runt, I looked at all the choices, the pros and cons and decided pine tar was the best fix. I was very satisfied with the results.
    About once a week or so I do something to remind my alpha roo that I'm in charge. I pick him up and carry him around just for the heck of it or chase him just a bit. When I'm out with the chickens I always keep an eye on him. You're right they can do serious damage with their spurs. The trick is to stay on top of it and make sure he never gets any ideas about using those spurs.
     
  9. lionpearl10

    lionpearl10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 22, 2008
    It cracks me up because about 20 years ago I had chickens, the little bantams and I just had them, I don't remember being all freaked out about them, in fact a couple of them used to love to sit high in one of the pine trees all the time, didn't want to come down sometimes for night. Thanks for the info, my little chickee seems OK in the garage, she did kind of look around at first saying what the heck is this but does not seem stressed at all. I will forever keep my eye on my roo, lol. never get complaciant. Thanks. lionpearl
     

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