Chickens smell really bad - BRINING DISCUSSION

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by PurpleChicken, Jun 11, 2008.

  1. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    We culled 4 roos on Sunday and Drum did a 5th on Monday.

    We put them all in a big pot with salt water.

    I started one rooster in soup monday night and when
    we strained the soup tuesday night it had a bad odor.
    The meat tasted fine. It was

    Then on tuesday I started two more in the soup pot, froze one,
    and gave one away. They were in the brine for 48 hours and
    room temp was around 75 degrees. This morning the soup
    that was simmering all night smelled bad like the birds did.
    It's more of a sulfur smell (sort of) than a rotting smell.

    We had thunderstorms coming in on sunday when we processed
    so they weren't as clean as usual but still ok. The skalding water
    was too hot(over 200) so I did cook them a bit.

    Any thought??? Do people usually brine in the refridgerator?
    Am I an idiot? [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2008
  2. Cuban Longtails

    Cuban Longtails Flock Mistress

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  3. cheeptrick

    cheeptrick Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 1, 2007
    New Hampshire
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2008
  4. Tuffoldhen

    Tuffoldhen Flock Mistress

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    I put my birds in salt brine soak in the fridge overnight.......simmering whole chicken shouldn't be a nasty smell...
     
  5. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Thanks for those replies and links. I just learned a lot.


    To begin with I didn't use nearly enough salt. Plus, even at room
    temp that water was too warm.

    Thanks again for the help.
     
  6. jhill1440

    jhill1440 Out Of The Brooder

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    Yep, we do our turkey with brine. Lots of salt, bring to a boil, let cool, pour over bird and ice down over night in a cooler. When I stick a thermometer in there the brine is under 40 degrees. I would guess if you used enough salt you would not have to use ice to cool and keep bacterial growth in check but it is easy enough to do for the safety.

    peace
    josh
     
  7. blueskylen

    blueskylen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    hi, just wondering if you brine all of your chickens before cooking, or just for special occasions? We are taking our 27 red broilers this Friday to be processed, and if the majority of folks are brining before cooking - that's what we'll do to.
     
  8. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Brining helps make tough birds tender so most of us do brine if we are culling
    standard breed birds which can be stringy, especially if they are older or free
    rangers.

    With 27 birds your gonna need an aweful big pot or lots of pots. Hopefully
    someone else with more experience on meat birds will chime in.
     
  9. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    I called my boss in Boston who is having his 9 week old, 9 pound
    Cornish Crosses processed on Saturday and he doesn't brine them.
    He said they do nothing but sit in front of the feeders so they won't
    need it.
     
  10. Riparian

    Riparian Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Did you remove the oil gland from the birds?
     

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