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Chickens throwing up and then just die, please help

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Tompike, Jun 20, 2017.

  1. Tompike

    Tompike Just Hatched

    21
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    Jun 20, 2017
    Utah
    This is probably going to be pretty long, sorry in advance, I just want to make sure I get all the details. So near the end of November I had this rooster who was about two and a half. I went out in the morning to let everyone out and he was laying in the corner not looking right. His face was kind of blue, like he wasn't properly breathing. I picked him up to take him inside to try to figure out what was wrong with him and so he wouldn't anyone else sick. He started to throw up all over. His breathing was raspy, like he was choking. I took a flashlight and looked down his throat, but I didn't see anything. He was acting weirdly for three or four days amd then suddenly he was fine. I kept him away from the others for another day to make sure, and he was still perfectly fine so I took him back out with the others. No problems for a month. Then he threw up and acted weirdly again so I took him back in the house. That night, I woke up the hear him choking. I took him out of the cage trying to find out what to do. After a minute, he started shaking and throwing up, kind of like a seizure, and then he died. I couldn't find anything even remotely similar on the internet for what could've been wrong with him. He also has this string of drool hanging out of his mouth, but I figured it was just like throw up or something. All the other chickens were perfectly healthy. He was a Cochin mix, a chicken I hatched so I have no idea who he was mixed with, my guess was a Plymouth Rock. Then in March, I went out to check on the chickens and one of the americanas, about eight years old, was lying on the ground, shaking with drool hanging out of her mouth and her comb and wattles were blue. I took her inside, inspected her and could find anything strange other than that she had really runny, extremely smelly, dark brown poop. I thought maybe it was an egg binding, so I took her and soaked her in warm water with espom salts. After a few hours I went out to check her and she had thrown up a lot and was shaking really bad. She died a few minutes later. Then today, I went out this morning to check on everybody and everything was fine, I fought with a Rhode Island Red to get the eggs out of the nesting box and after a bit I left. I went out about half an hour later thinking I forgot something, and the the Rhode Island Red was lying on the ground dead, wattles and comb blue, drool coming out of her mouth. She was fine half an hour ago and then she was laying there dead. She was about nine years old. It also happened a fourth time, but I can't remember any of the details except that it was the same basic thing, she was perfectly healthy and then just started shaking, threw up, and died. She was a turken, about three years old. I don't know what's happening, I can't find anything anywhere about what could be wrong. Any help would be greatly appreciated, I don't want to lose anymore of my flock, they're like children to me. After awhile of searching when the first rooster got sick in November, I found a vet and took him there, but it was over two hours away, very expensive, and the others died before I even had a chance to take them. When I took him, he said that something seemed wrong with his crop and he might have a fungal infection. They gave him a crop bra and ran a test, but it came back negative.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2017
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    My first thought would be a crop problem, generally if the crop isn't emptying they will drink more water, when the crop is too full stuff will come up and chickens will often aspirate, and choke and die. I'm not sure if crop problems are contagious, I know that some are caused by fungal infections.
     
  3. Tompike

    Tompike Just Hatched

    21
    6
    19
    Jun 20, 2017
    Utah
    I just remembered, I actually did find a vet the first time around, but it was over two hours away and very expensive. When I took the rooster that was exactly what he said and gave him a crop bra, but it didn't seem to do much good and the test for the fungal infection, I forget what it was called, came back negative. I'll have to edit that in. I completely forgot about that. What should a healthy crop feel like? I usually feel some of them every once in awhile. Most of them are hard but sometimes one will feel squishy. I'll have to check them more often.
     
  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    The one that I had with similar symptoms had a distended bloated crop. I massage her crop after carefully forcing some of the liquid out. Her crop resumed working after that. A normal crop should be firm with stuff in it. I think mine was plugged up if that's possible and I dislodged what was blocking it. If you are having multiple birds with similar problems than I would think it's something environmental. Birds will often eat things they shouldn't like strings, and nails, among a few things found in crops.
     
  5. Tompike

    Tompike Just Hatched

    21
    6
    19
    Jun 20, 2017
    Utah
    That's what I first thought, that maybe they ate something, so I went through and raked all over their pen and picked everything up. I cleaned the barn and all around. I'll have to do that again seeing as it didn't happen until awhile after I went through and made sure everything was picked up. Thanks
     

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