Chickens Too Chicken to Integrate...

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Brillig, May 29, 2017.

  1. Brillig

    Brillig Chirping

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    May 20, 2016
    I have a mixed flock of Orpingtons and Ameracuana (five hens and two roosters - the imbalanced ratio is a result of predation)...I have six Cochin hens that have been exposed to the flock for weeks...They have actually been living in a quarantine pen in the coop/run for a couple of weeks...I moved them out of the quarantine pen last week and they have been hiding in a corner of the coop ever since...They hide all day and night unless the others are out foraging...Any ideas on how I can get them to start mixing???

    Thanks in advance...
     
  2. Mace Gill

    Mace Gill Songster

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    How old are the new hens?
     
  3. Brillig

    Brillig Chirping

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    May 20, 2016
    New hens are fourteen weeks and the others are about eleven months...
     
  4. Mace Gill

    Mace Gill Songster

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    Could be that they are still smaller and being bullied. Chickens usually sort out their own politics and as long as blood isn't being shed and no one is being injured it should be okay in time. They'll grow, gain confidence, and find their place. In the mean time, while everyone else is out foraging, encourage them to come out of the coop into the run as much as possible. Special treats can go a long way. If you have to, close the run door while the flock is out ... even if only for an hour ... and get them babies out into the run. Treats for all, and let them get a feel for the space unmolested.
     
  5. Mace Gill

    Mace Gill Songster

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    When we introduced 2 Jersey Giant pullets (about eight weeks at the time) to our flock of 8 two year old Australorps, there was bullying. Was a few days before they would emerge on their own from the coop, and we spent the better part of the summer with the pullets in the run while the flock was out foraging. We didn't want the babies to be chased away from the flock and get lost, so in the run they stayed until late summer/early fall. After that, while out, they would hang back by themselves. Eventually, one of the other hens started to pal around with them. By now ... they are fully grown, fully integrated, and are not even at the bottom of the pecking order.
     

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