chicks accute eye infection

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Madiha Farhan, Sep 4, 2016.

  1. Madiha Farhan

    Madiha Farhan Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 26, 2016
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    Hello all.. Its my third time I am posting same chicks eye problem.. Still not satisfied from any answer. First it was
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    After Treatment of Baytril and Antibiotic Eye Ointment it changed into
    [​IMG]
    But still poor chick is not fully recovered.. Eye infection is still same. It looks like flesh is covering his eye. [​IMG]

    Age of chick is about 6 months but growth is stopped due to infection.. Suffering from last 3 months.. help plz
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    The advice you recieved from @Eggcessive on the other thread is very good.
    Antibiotics may help with secondary infections, but won't necessarily "cure" the illness.
    If it's been 3 months of suffering, then the kindest thing to consider is to cull your bird. I'm sorry.
     
  3. azygous

    azygous True BYC Addict

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    I agree that culling is the best option at this point. The bird has to be in a lot of pain.

    The fact that this "infection" hasn't responded to antibiotic treatment is a clue that something more serious is underlying the manifestation of this optical involvement. There are non-treatable viruses such as Lymphotic leucosis that can cause such symptoms, and that may be what's going on in this case.

    Since these viruses are extremely contagious, it would be a wise step to have a necropsy done if and when you cull. This will inform you with certainty what you are dealing with, and knowing will help you make important decisions about the remainder of your flock.
     
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  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    x2! That bird is in tough shape, and a necropsy will give you valuable information. Your state veterinary lab would be the best place for this, or your local vet sending in samples as an alternative. Mary
     
  5. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    OP lives in Pakistan, so I'm not sure what she veterinary resources she has available, but a necropsy would be helpful for sure.

    Not picking on her at all, she has tried her best to help the poor little thing, but just had another pass not long ago, so whatever illness she has it is contagious. Depending on which illness she is dealing with, it may be best to cull all, if others are ill, sanitize, wait for a period of time and start over. That may sound harsh, and I'm not meaning to be, but to get a contagious illness like this under control looks like it will be a struggle.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2016
  6. azygous

    azygous True BYC Addict

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    Pakistan is far from being a backward, third world country. Even if our OP is in a rural area, it's possible to locate a lab that does necropsies and ship the body to them. I live in one of the most rural and backward areas of the USA and I was able to locate a lab through my local university extension office when I needed a necropsy.

    I was reading through the OPs posts that indicate this may be a recurring problem in her flock. This is another indication that we are dealing with a contagious disease in this post. I can't stress enough how important it is to know what disease you are dealing with. My flock happens to be carrying lymphotic leucosis, and I learned this after several hens and a very young rooster died.

    This particular virus that infects my flock is a form of avian leukemia and it manifests in tumors. The rooster that died had tumors on his heart, lungs, and liver, the liver weighing two pounds at the time of necropsy. This virus is similar to Marek's but isn't as long lived in the environment, so I could cull my entire flock, if I wished, and start all over.

    I decided against this, however, since I learned that most chickens develop a resistance to the virus and can lead normal, healthy lives. This has proven to be the right decision for me, and I haven't had any more deaths or chickens falling sick in the several years since the rooster was diagnosed, perhaps because they have been getting good nourishment from being fed fermented feed and have been able to build resistance.

    The photo of this poor chicken's eye looks a lot like a tumor rather than an infection. Ocular tumors are one of the most common types of tumors associated with Lymphotic leucosis.
     

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