chicks are all pooping blood

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by rainbowhorse3, Apr 18, 2011.

  1. rainbowhorse3

    rainbowhorse3 Out Of The Brooder

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    i have a ton of chicks. some in brooder boxes, some running loose in my shop, and some in a run. i have noticed that all of the chicks that i hatched myself, that are in the brooder boxes, all seem to be fine. however, i've got a bunch of chicks from tractor supply, and a bunch of other older ones in my run with them. now, alot of them are pooping blood. what do i do about it?? how do i make it stop?? are they all going to die?? i've already lost at least 3 of them. i'm putting vinegar in their water as of last night, cuz a farmer friend of mine told me that i needed to do that and that it's the same as putting antibiotics in their water. what else can i do? am i going to lose my whole flock. i moved some of them into the coop with my full grown chickens, and then noticed that a few of those ones were pooping blood too. are my full grown chickens going to get it now too?? i'm really worried now. not to mention i'm supposed to be getting 4 6wk old poults today. UGH!!! i cannot put them anywhere near the chickens. i don't even know if i want to bring them on the property. any and all advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Get liquid Corid (concentrated Amprolium) ASAP. Put 9-10 cc/ml in a gallon waterer each day for 5 days, changing daily. They have coccidiosis. If you can't find Corid, which is preferred, get Sulmet. It's very common, but needs to be treated now.

    Cocci is what medicated feed is medicated against, but they still get it.

    This is a concise, easy to read article, though I'm not sure I'd want to keep poultry on wire, personally.

    Coccidiosis In Chickens

    What Is Coccidiosis?

    * Coccidiosis is a common parasitic disease of poultry which affects the digestive tract and is primarily found in chickens and turkeys.


    Symptoms

    * Ruffled feathers.
    * Unthriftiness.
    * Head drawn back into shoulders.
    * A chilled appearance.
    * Diarrhea which may have blood in it.
    * If not treated can lead to mortality.

    Causes

    * Coccidiosis is caused by a protozoan parasite (coccidia).
    * Poultry are exposed to the protozoan parasite via their droppings, dirty drinkers and damp litter in their huts.
    * Coccidia thrives in damp conditions such as damp chicken litter and is found in chicken manure.
    * Coccidia can also be found in water that is not kept clean and free of chicken droppings.

    Treatment

    * Separate affected poultry and use medicated feed and water.
    * Use of coccidiostats.

    Prevention

    * Keeping poultry on a wire floor where their droppings can fall through.
    * Feeding coccidiostats in the growing diet can help the poultry to build up an immunity to coccidiosis.
    * Vaccinate against coccidiosis.​
     
  3. rainbowhorse3

    rainbowhorse3 Out Of The Brooder

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    should i give it to my laying hens too?? since they've been in contact with the chicks......
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    The hens are probably already immune. By about 12 weeks old, most birds are. No, just the chicks right now, unless you do suspect the hens are also infected. If they're all together in one coop, everyone would have to be medicated. Corid is a thiamine blocker, not an antibiotic, so it won't hurt the eggs.
     
  5. ChooksChick

    ChooksChick BeakHouse's Mad Chicken Scientist

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    In the meantime, while you're getting the Corid, if you have powdered milk you can mix it with their feed- 50%. That will get their system started in recovery by flushing the coccidia out, but you need Corid, quick!!
     
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    And plain, no-sugar active culture yogurt will help soothe the intestines and restore good gut bacteria.
     
  7. rainbowhorse3

    rainbowhorse3 Out Of The Brooder

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    ok....got corid! yay! gonna get them all going on it, including my hens. i should probably give it to the turkeys too, right? since i just brought them home today, and i don't want them to catch it also. they are 6 week old bronze breasted turkeys. they are not and will not be in with the chicks, but are on the same property, and my big chickens are already hanging out by their pen in the yard. the chickens have all been subjected to the infected chicks.
     
  8. rainbowhorse3

    rainbowhorse3 Out Of The Brooder

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    should i also put electrolytes and vitamins in with their water?
     
  9. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    No, not at the same time. They don't actually "catch" cocci. It's in the soil everywhere and there are 9 types, though not all may be on your property. It's a protozoan, not a bacteria. The oocycsts that cause it can just overwhelm their systems till they become immune.
     
  10. rainbowhorse3

    rainbowhorse3 Out Of The Brooder

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    i couldn't get liquid corid, so i got the powder. i hope that's just as good. i'm mixing it in the water......2 teaspoons to a gallon. i hope that's right. i lost another chick today. i think that's 4 so far. i've got another one that i don't think is going to survive the night. i brought that one in the house with his own water and food, but like i said, he's very weak at this point, and i don't think he's going to make it. hopefully he makes a liar out of me, cuz he's the prettiest one of the bunch. i am currently medicating every bird i have except the new turkeys. they are 6 1/2 weeks old, and across the yard from the chicks. should i medicate them too, just to be safe??
     

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