Chicks are in the coop, I'm having second thoughts!

My1stChickens

Songster
5 Years
May 16, 2015
197
158
141
Texas, USA
Moved the chicks out to their tractor today.... they had some play time in the run portion, then there was some drama as I had to get them all back in the coop portion. They did not want to be caught, did not want to go up the ramp, and Mabel scraped her foot and threw herself down as if she were dying. But they are all safe in the coop. And the entire tractor is in the garage. I have a regular light up at the ventilation window, just so they have some light, but it's still in the mid 70's. I may swap it for a heat lamp when the temp drops further, as we'll see a low of 68. I realize they probably could snuggle and stay warm enough, but they are used to about 75 since they have been living in my spare bedroom, and are used to a light all night.

Now, they did get stressed today-- new things to see, and had to be caught and of course Mabel scraped her foot. Are they going to be okay? I realize that opinions will run the gamut-- from bring them back inside and take turns holding them..... to shut the garage door, don't thing about it til after morning coffee and if one died in the night, you still have the other 7. But I'm asking for opinions anyway..... They have food, water, shavings, their little roosts, and will be secure. They will have light and some degree of heat based on temp. Have I missed anything?
 

Mini Meat

Songster
5 Years
Nov 17, 2014
452
177
166
SF bay area (south bay)
My Coop
My Coop
Question: How old are they?

Assuming they are old enough... we all have three choices in life... adapt, migrate, or die.

Since they can't migrate I will bet they will choose to adapt, except maybe for Mabel, she sounds high drama to me... who needs that anyway (just kidding).

I'm sure all will be well.
 

My1stChickens

Songster
5 Years
May 16, 2015
197
158
141
Texas, USA
Mabel is a hot mess. I had been led to believe that when a human moved a chicken tractor, the chickens would scurry out of the way. Not Mabel, she sticks her ****** foot at the edge and I end up scuffing her foot. She shrieked like she was being killed and threw herself down, thought I had killed her. Turns out there is a small abraded area on the foot, not actually "bleeding" but like a raspberry. I put triple antibiotic ointment on it, and apologized profusely.

Anyway, these are feedstore chickens so ages are approximate/guesses. I have had them 22 days, in a brooder box in my house. When I got them, I think the RIR and Buttercup were just a few days old as they were by far the smallest. The Ameraucanas were at least 7-10 days, since they had been at the store for at least a week. The Cream Legbars were notably bigger so I figure they are likely 5 weeks now. Trying to find a happy medium between crowded birds trying to fly in a brooder box-- and the needs of the youngest, so decided to move them to the coop, but keep the coop secured in the garage unless they are out for playtime in the grass.

Our highs are in the 80's, low in the low/mid 60s so weather is not a big concern, but I live in Texas and we're having insane rain so no way are they moving totally outside. Coop is pretty substantial-- picture below from their playtime today. The lower pic shows one of the oldest/biggest, a medium size, and the RIR is by far the smallest.



 
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MickeysChicks

Songster
5 Years
Jul 23, 2014
206
37
116
South Carolina
Yeah! Now take a deep breathe and enjoy your chicken t.v.
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They're alot tougher than you think, even the drama chickens! I have a few of those myself (often referred to as the aggravating leghorns!)
 

abottrell

Songster
6 Years
May 9, 2015
109
140
166
Utah
I have all sorts of second thoughts. My "babies" have been in big girl coop for a week and I still check on them tons, but, they seem so much happier out there.
 

My1stChickens

Songster
5 Years
May 16, 2015
197
158
141
Texas, USA
Second day is going better. Figured out a dolly on the front end without the wheels makes things much easier, wheeled them to a grassy spot in the shade and opened their door. Agnes has always been the most courageous and she was the first one out of the coop. Phyllis was actually just watching in disbelief from the doorway, and got pushed out by her sisters so the two of them were down in the grass alone. No one else was coming, and eventually this made Phyllis nervous enough to scoot back up the ramp. So I pushed them all out, and blocked the door so I could clean the coop out. They've all had food and water, and two have snuck back inside but six are happily playing outside. I think we'll get this. Next hurdle is getting them safely back into the garage this evening.

Reflecting back, I intended to get 7 chickens at $3-4/each. I ended up with 8, because I had to have the cream legbars for blue eggs... and they were NOT $3-4/chicks. Then I had to buy food, feeders, waterers, nipples, peatmoss, electrolytes and vitamins and antibiotics. Then a tractor. And next I will have to convert a stall to a coop. I will be doing well for my first "free" egg to not cost more than $2000.
 

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