Chicks digging in bedding?

Mulegirl

Chirping
Mar 10, 2018
31
96
69
Illinois
Hello everyone! I' brand new to chickens so please forgive me for all the questions. :)

I got 4 chicks,2 Barred Rocks and 2 Easter Eggers. They are right around 4-5 days old as far as I can tell. They have been digging holes in the bedding and laying in them. Or just digging and scratching around. Does this mean they are too warm? Or is it normal chick stuff?
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
20,622
15,055
821
Oregon
My Coop
My Coop
Normal chick stuff :) Their natural instinct is to scratch around, just like they'll do when they're older and living outside looking for tasty things to eat. They do it at this age too.
X2.... At this point a mama hen would have therm out doing just this. If you think this caught you off guard just wait until the 1st time you catch them taking a dust bath in that bedding.
 

lazy gardener

Crossing the Road
7 Years
Nov 7, 2012
27,615
27,051
917
CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
You can give your chicks a plug of sod from an untreated lawn. A clump of sod, about 6" diameter. Plop it upside down right in the middle of their brooder. First they will be terrorized by the invading monster. Then, they will timidly inspect it. It will give them: grit, minerals, first greens, practice at digging for their grub, where they will be rewarded with some seeds, insects, and perhaps a worm or two. They will get first dust bath, a good dose of beneficial bacteria and fungi to kick start their gut flora and immune systems. And, infinite play value. Most importantly, they will get their first exposure to cocci and other pathogens in your soil. Yes. This is important! They receive the most benefit from early exposure. In the first 2 weeks of life they are still in the window of opportunity, when they have highest levels of antibodies received from their mother.
 

Mulegirl

Chirping
Mar 10, 2018
31
96
69
Illinois
You can give your chicks a plug of sod from an untreated lawn. A clump of sod, about 6" diameter. Plop it upside down right in the middle of their brooder. First they will be terrorized by the invading monster. Then, they will timidly inspect it. It will give them: grit, minerals, first greens, practice at digging for their grub, where they will be rewarded with some seeds, insects, and perhaps a worm or two. They will get first dust bath, a good dose of beneficial bacteria and fungi to kick start their gut flora and immune systems. And, infinite play value. Most importantly, they will get their first exposure to cocci and other pathogens in your soil. Yes. This is important! They receive the most benefit from early exposure. In the first 2 weeks of life they are still in the window of opportunity, when they have highest levels of antibodies received from their mother.

So,literally just go take a chunk of dirt/grass from the yard and put it in with them? You said they don't need grit for it,that they will get it from the small stones in the dirt,right?
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom