Chicks dying during incubation - *graphic pics*

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Shohanna, Jan 10, 2014.

  1. Shohanna

    Shohanna Out Of The Brooder

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    I have pics and was hoping someone could give me input. Using a reptipro 6000. Just got a hydrometer to monitor humidity but had greatly reduced/ eliminated any added moisture since I lost two during the last[​IMG]
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    hatch. Had to help as well. The pics show 4 fertile eggs but none surviving to hatch. I can't see any reason they died. Very discouraging. Humidity was 25% and I put in a small damp paper towel. That bumped it up for a short period to 50% then it drops down. I have two thermometers to be safe and temps vary between 99.7 to a little over 100. Can't seem to keep it constant. All eggs are on automatic turner. I open to arriate several times. Please give me some suggestions. Thanks!
     
  2. gimmie birdies

    gimmie birdies Overrun With Chickens

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    I would have candled before lockdown, you def needed a dryer hatch. This is why I wait for an external pip before bumping moisture.[​IMG]
    one way you would have known it was too wet in there was to candle the pointy end on day 16 if it is clear then they are developing slower and has too much liquid in egg- if you locked down an egg like that it would drown- some hatching books dont give hope for clear on pointy end after day 16- but I hatched these 2 babies out just took longer....[​IMG]
    them now...[​IMG]
     
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  3. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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  4. Avlana

    Avlana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My best guess would be genetics or lack of vigor. Or anything else to do with the parents, like nutrition. Or it could very well be problems with the temps. Are the temps fairly steady in all areas of the incubator? Maybe there's warm or cool spots? Double check the accuracy on the thermometers. I think running the humidity at 50% during incubation is a bit high. But you usually don't see deaths from humidity problems, either too high or low, until just before hatching or upon internal pip. Those embryos are a bit young. So my best guess, is an issue with the parents or temps. Make sure there's no major temp swings and all areas of the incubator are at an even temp. Just my opinion. Good luck with the next hatch! You'll get it down pat :)
     
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  5. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    Avlana, I often run the humidity at 50% during incubation and I haven't had problems with too much moisture in the egg or lack of air cell growth. I agree genetics, temperature, age of the eggs, or nutrition could be to blame here. Have a look through the article I linked above for more info. It's a very interesting read.
     
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  6. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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  7. otis7

    otis7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Gimmie birdies, do you have an example photo of too much moisture in the egg? I was misinformed at the start of incubation and my humidity at 60-65. We are on day 16 and there is movement and seemingly healthy chicks, but I've kept the humidity lower. Id love to see what a small egg end space looks like (so I can't find a reason to worry more!)
     
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  8. Vetman122

    Vetman122 New Egg

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    So i doesnt really matter what humidity just put a jug of water just enough for it not to dry in the 18-24 days turn them roll them around not tooo slow or too fast i wont recomend egg.turrners they suck honestly do it atleast 2 times a day at least or three one in the morning.one in the evening and one at night if u go to school one before u go to school one after school and one before bed,how u thibk the chicken.does.it they kick them.and all that oh one last thing keep your temp at 98.4-101 99.5 is the best temp so try it out k
     
  9. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    Vetman122, welcome to BYC, glad you joined us! The correct humidity in the incubator is not as important as the correct temperature, but it is important. Too high humidity can cause insufficient air cell development, excess moisture in the egg which can cause the chick to drown, or "swollen" chicks. Too little humidity can cause the air cells to grow too big, malpositioned chicks and shrink wrapped chicks (at hatch). During incubation it's important to keep an eye on either the humidity, with a hygrometer, or to monitor air cell development and/or weighing the eggs. An egg should lose between 11% and 13% of it's weight in moisture during incubation. This is what the air cell development should look like:

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Shohanna

    Shohanna Out Of The Brooder

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    Course never fails...we had a tornado yesterday and lost electricity....incubator got down to 87. I was able to take it to a friends but wasn't sure if it was too late. Checked tonight and saw life....now will they make it to hatch?? Humidity is at 29% and seems stable. Air sacks look good. I have an auto turner but still open frequently to aerate. I will say the temp fluctuates slightly. I think partly when its blowing seems to increade then fall back based on the digital I have in there. My one little guy needs a friend. On a side note....I had him wrapped in a towel in bed with me to keep warm. Seems no sores for the wear!
     

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