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Chicks in late summer/NY

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by lizzy14, Jun 15, 2011.

  1. lizzy14

    lizzy14 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 9, 2011
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    Hi all! My husband and I are about to start raising chickens. I've been researching it all, breeds, coop design, diet, etc. I am about to place an order for pick-up from a breeder that I found on here (about 1.5 hr away from me) for 7-9 Welsummer chicks around the end of August. Question #1, I've heard that spring is the best time for raising chicks, so can anyone tell me of the drawbacks of raising chicks in late summer? The reason we are waiting is because I want to allow enough time to prepare a brooder and build a coop. And we can wait until spring if we have to, but that'll be a long, cold winter....
     
  2. 7L Farm

    7L Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can get chicks in August . Why can't you? What are you worried about? I wouldn't see a problem with it. Probably won't even need a heat lamp except at night & by the first cold snap they would be feathered out.
     
  3. Nicole01

    Nicole01 Overrun With Chickens

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    The only drawbacks are you'll have to wait a little longer before your chicks start laying eggs. :p. There is more of a breed variety in the spring, especially during chick days. Good luck with your chicks. Next round I'm going to get a Welsummer. [​IMG]
     
  4. duckinnut

    duckinnut Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nothing wrong with summer chicks,they are feathered out by winter,just make sure your coop is insulated because the might not have enough body mass. The only drawback is you still got buy eggs around the holidays.My first girls started laying in early October last year,its nice not having to worry about running out of eggs. My wife suddenly turned into Betty Crocker.
     
  5. lizzy14

    lizzy14 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Rochester area/WNY
    Okay, great. Thanks everyone. Yeah, I realize they won't be laying until the spring. I am looking forward to those eggs in my baked goods! [​IMG]
     
  6. chicks4erin

    chicks4erin Out Of The Brooder

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    May 29, 2011
    Chicago Suburb
    Good question, I was wondering the same thing. I was worried about the chicks over the winter, but it would be nice to have fresh eggs come spring.
     
  7. magdalene74

    magdalene74 Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok, this didnt get many replies back in the day, so im resurrecting it in hopes of getting more, rather than start a new post and get a "UTFSE" (not that ive ever actually seen anyone on BYC say that, but once bitten, on any forum, twice shy LOL) I FINALLY closed on my farm, two months LATER than they said it would happen, but everyone is out, and we are working on getting IN, we just made a deal with the electric company to turn on the electric out there, but in order to avoid too much of a double bill, we told them to cut off the electric here in town in two weeks.. TWO WEEKS!!! can you imagine how fast that time is going to go now that there is a deadline??? So... hubby promises to get my coop built, which wont be hard cause there is already a coop that is there, but not secure enough (obviously, since previous owners chickens all got eaten by raccoons... ::sigh:: but he used chicken wire, NOTHING on top, and was NOT smart enough to put his chickens away for the night (!!!) there are also several other outbuildings that would make good coops, AND a barn.. but what i really want is a chicken tractor, though i havent quite figured out how those work in the winter.

    .. Anyway, he says as soon as we get that set up, which will be SOON he promises, no later than the end of this month hopefully.. so late summer early fall here in NE Ohio and he is going to get me some full grown chickens to start with, so we can have eggs immediately... but i want babies...(in addition.. im greedy) he wants to keep 20 chickens, since we eat so many eggs, in this family of six with a low carb lifestyle, and have plenty of family who will buy or accept any extras, so im hoping to get ten full grown and ten to 15 chicks, depending.. to allow for any first timer mistake losses... which i hope i dont have but.. reality.

    My reasoning is that we dont really know what we are going to get when it comes to buying the full grown chickens.. will they be suitable, will they be used to free ranging/pasturing, will they be OLD chickens that are being foisted off on gullible me that wont lay, etc.. so if i get them, AND the chicks, then even if i get very little eggs NOW.. soon (spring) i will get many :) and even if the hens i get are old and decrepit, hopefully i can count on HALF of them laying every day, right? and we can deal with 5 eggs a day if we supplement with storebought (yuck) but i dont wanna get more full growns than that because i think it will not be the best use of money or feed over the winter months..

    .but thats avoiding my real question..(zackattack, will you PLEASE refrain from sitting on my arm and half the keyboard with your entire body in my face and rubbing your head against my mouth while im typing.. please? Love you kitty but dang... LOL. three month olds are SOOO needy lol) Ok, so what are the real drawbacks, if any, of brooding chicks at this time of year, where should i keep them, and how much supervision do they need?

    I REALLY dont think i will be able to convince hubby to keep them in the house itself.. BUT there is a house trailer, with electric, about 30 feet away that is empty, except for two dogs, who are confined to the living room and kitchen area. (the owner is a previous renter and has promised to move them soon, he checks on them and feeds them three times a day and keeps them together so they can be company for eachother.. (come on zack, beat it!! ) i dont like it, but i dont wanna be a butt about it either... (note, dont like it for the dogs.. i dont care if they are there, as long as they are taken care of, i just dont think its fair to them.. of course with my kids there im sure we can talk him into letting them play with them and that will be much better for the dogs) but i digress..

    there are several empty bedrooms that i could set up a brooder in, if this is something that you can do without being on top of them 24 hours a day...is it??? cause if not im just gonna have to hope one of the chickens gets broody and i can get some out of her, because, like i said, animals in the house is NOT gonna work with hubby.

    So... advice, instructions, im gonna go read all the brooding stuff again, but i better make it tomorrow, since its like four hours past my bedtime right now LOL. I hate it when my mind keeps me going after my sleeping pills kick in... my insomnia gets so much worse.. then the cycle of late nights, late mornings starts ::sigh:: lol. Help? I will go back and break this up, right now its one solid run on sentence of text.. another side effect of being past my meds lol. Thanks in advance!!!!
     
  8. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    My Coop
    Hi and [​IMG]
    if you brood your chicks in the house, you will rue the day you did. [​IMG] When the chicks shed
    their down and start to feather out, the down covers everything in the room with a fine chicken dust.
    Everything in the room needs to be cleaned individually. every nook, every cranny, every dust catcher,.
    All the curtains. . I have done it two years because I had no other opton. This year is the end of this
    mess. Hubby Bob is getting me a shed next yeat. Craigslist has all kinds of sheds and playhouses
    you can modify into outside brooders. Just run an extension cord out there. If you worry about
    hot lights and fire get a sweeter heater. (
    http://www.sweeterheater.com/ ). They can be
    side mounted or hung. Easily cleaned and come in different sizes.
    Best Success,
    Karen
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  9. magdalene74

    magdalene74 Out Of The Brooder

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    Well since the "other" trailer that im talking about is going to be torn down and not lived in anymore, from what you are saying this would likely work out? My main concern was from what it looked like everyone WAS keeping them in their houses and i didnt want to do that, because i figured it would be just like you just described LOL, messy :) Like i said, the only ones living in the other trailer are a couple dogs, and its been that way for a year so that trailer is toast, i just didnt know if you had to be right on top of the chicks or not. IM not sleeping in that trailer LOL. So if you are planning to keep yours in a shed, i gather you arent planning to live in there, so it must be an ok idea. How often should i check on them, do they need checked on during the night, or as long as they have adequate food/safe water they should be ok? Planning to get a little two litre with a chicken nipple on it.. that way i dont have to worry about them knocking over or falling into their water and drowning or freezing...any other suggestions? Thanks so much for responding!
     
  10. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    western PA
    My Coop
    Hi [​IMG] ,
    http://www.sweeterheater.com/ They are very knowledgeable. If you tell them how
    many chicks you want to brood and they can fill you in on which on you need.
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sweeter-Heater/543772455653674
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/396956/sweeter-heater-vs-flat-panel-heater I The sweeter heater is a great product and also gives the chicks a "natural" hiding place underneath. Plus, no fire worries. If hung, you can adjust the height as the chicks grow. If they get scared they can run under the sweeter heater for warmth and safety just like they would the mother hen.
    I have a couple of thermocubes. Haven't used them yet but have heard real good things about them.
    http://www.thermocube.com/
    I have one of these flat panel heaters and it is useless. What a waste of money even tho I got it 1/2 price.
    You should have a nipple for every 4 chicks. Just decide how many you want to brood and multiple your needs accordingly.
    Use a hanging feeder. You can raise it as needed. Feeders set on top of the chips/floor constantly have chips kicked into them
    and it's a waste of feed.
    Best Success,
    Karen
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2014

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