Chicks in November, or wait til' early Spring?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by nine9d, Oct 17, 2017.

  1. nine9d

    nine9d Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey all,
    I have an option of getting some day old bantam chicks in the beginning of November. I was planning to wait until early Spring to start my first endeavor with chickies, but this opportunity has me thinking should I take the plunge now?

    I am located in Southern NY (Dutchess County), and I have read many people doing Fall raising as opposed to Spring, since the chicks are old enough to start laying when Springtime comes around. Any recommendation as whether to start or would I be better to wait? Is it too late to start in November, or is it harder?

    Thanks for all of your help and info.
    - Ross
     
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  2. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    Hi Ross, welcome to BYC. There are a number of reasons why I'd not start chicks this time of the year. (as a matter of fact, I'm breaking yet an other broody biddy as we speak)

    I absolutely won't brood chicks in the house. Been there, done that. Even if you can stand the DUST, the smell, the noise, and THE DUST till the chicks are off heat, you are then faced with acclimating them to the winter time temps when they are weaned off heat (if you've brooded them inside.) And, if you brood them outside, or even inside, and are hit with a winter storm that knocks power out for a few hours, or even a few days, (we've lost power for a record of 13 DAYS) you'll be scrambling to keep your chicks warm.

    Got your coop yet? Got it wired for electric? IMO, that's a necessity in cold country. I will not, and sometimes CAN NOT lug water out to a freezing coop multiple times/day. Birds need access to water all day every day.

    Bantams are a bit more delicate to get started, I'm told. Granted, it's been 49 years since I've had bantams. (mine were spring babies)

    Finally, there's a learning curve when you get started with chickens. Best to deal with that learning curve in warmer weather than during a winter cold snap or an ice storm.
     
  3. penny1960

    penny1960 Going back to La La Land Premium Member

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    Hey there not ideal but very doable do you have a closed coop you could raise them in or a brooder?
     
  4. nine9d

    nine9d Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the replies lazy and penny. I know I am excited, but I can wait. It's just the opportunity presented itself is all so I figured I would ask. I will be either purchasing and/or building a coop. I have no problem in getting things together if and when need be. Thanks again. Any more info, please send my way.
     
  5. peeper89

    peeper89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    u can spend winter gettin coop ready for spring baby

    need coop 1st anyway
     
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  6. CapricornFarm

    CapricornFarm Plant it ALL! Premium Member

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    First i would build a brooder. Then a chicken tractor and or a coop. Do your research and decide what type of coop you want. I have not heard of many people that are satisfied with prebuilt coops. How many chickens do you plan on keeping and how much space will they need? Build your coop twice as big as you think you need it because bigger is better when it comes to chickens. Also find out what predators are in your area. I do not recommend poultry wire unless using welded wire over it. Too easy for a stray dog or coon to get in.
    Good luck! Spring is much better!
     
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  7. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    Plan on a minimum of 4 s.f. in coop, 10 s.f. in run per bird.
     
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  8. nine9d

    nine9d Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know that we have some predators in the area, but not many make it to my yard being it is completely fenced. But I know a feisty racoon or 2.

    My town allows you to keep up to 12 chickens (no roo's). My initial plan is to get 7 bantams (5 EE, and 2 Porcelain d'uccle). I've been researching these chicks a long time and this is what I settled on.

    I keep reading that bantams don't need as much space as regular sized fowl, but that is neither here or there. Maybe one day I will expand and go to 12, who knows. Does the 4/10 sq. ft. rules still apply with bantams?

    Spring it is, now how early is 2 early to get them? LOL!
     
  9. Hello.....Around here in Alberta people get Chicks late March or early April so they can grow in the Brooder and then be transitioned outside as the temps get warmer and they feather out....
    Best wishes and good luck in the spring.....Its just a 6 month or so wait....Just around the corner really ....:th.....I hate Winter......:barnie
     

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