chicks mouths open are they panting?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by dddCT, Aug 11, 2008.

  1. dddCT

    dddCT Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 28, 2008
    Durham, CT
    I have 12 5 day old chicks and have noticed that several of them will have their mouths open almost like panting like a dog or that "duh" look you'll sometimes get from one of your kids :pLOL They seem otherwise comfortable and I havent noticed them clustered in any one area. They're all eating and drinking well. Should I be concerned?
     
  2. tiffanyh

    tiffanyh Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 8, 2007
    Connecticut
    Hi...
    are you keeping a thermometer in the brooder to see what temps they are at? It could be a bit high. That would cause them to pant. THey huddle together if the temps are low, they may pant and drink more water if the temps are high. THey should be at 95F and you can just put an outdoor thermometer in the brooder to see how hot it is.
     
  3. shangri-lafarms

    shangri-lafarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 24, 2008
    NY-Upstate Adirondacks
    They def. sound like they are too hot, what I do is move the light source a few inches farther from them, this usually works...
     
  4. dddCT

    dddCT Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 28, 2008
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    we bought a hygrometer and thermometer and have it in the brooder. It says it 92.5 which is lower than it should be I thought for the first week. Should I lower it more?
     
  5. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Chicks do pant when hot.
    I highly recommend always putting a brooder's heat source at one end of the brooder, and being sure to construct a fairly long brooder (3 feet long is usually good enough). That way, as temps fluctuate, the chicks can move to the cooler end of the brooder during the hotter part of the day, away from the heat source. Also, keep the waterer in the cooler end of the brooder so it is a ready source for cooling down whenever needed.
    Be sure to pull heat source a little further out of brooder (or reduce the wattage of the lamp's bulb) each week so temps are reduced by approx 5 degrees Fahrenheit per week. Also, having a thermometer in the brooder to help keep track of temps really helps!
    Best wishes!
     
  6. Wildsky

    Wildsky Wild Egg!

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    Do they have a "warm" and "cool" side in the brooder? make sure they have an area to move away from the lamp - or move towards it.
     
  7. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 25, 2008
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    Quote:Yes--The thermometer may be defective, and chicks themselves will give the best reliable measurement of their comfort level.
    If you use a fairly long brooder with heat source at only one end, the chicks should do a fine job of keeping themselves located in an area that's the ideal temp for their development.
     
  8. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    The thermometer measures ambient heat, not radiant, which is what a heat lamp
    gives off. Chicks naturally go to the light for warmth, no matter how hot it is.

    Turn off the light and see if they stop panting. If they do you know it's too hot.
     
  9. REELDOC

    REELDOC Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 18, 2008
    Triad, North Carolina
    At what point do you completely remove the heat and rely on ambient temp in the room, assuming the room isn't air conditioned and the temp is around 75-80 degrees?
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2008
  10. Wildsky

    Wildsky Wild Egg!

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    Quote:Its really difficult to say with certainty when the chicks will be fine without heat.

    I started in the third week, turning heat off during the day - when they didn't go out in their little tractor, and slowly they were getting no heat at all - and they were fine, acting normal - having fun, cuddling to sleep but not PILED up in a desparate attempt to keep warm - you just have to watch them....
     

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