Chicks raised in a cage with no grit

lovemelovemybirds

Songster
9 Years
Apr 28, 2010
102
11
146
Grand Junction
I rescued two 6 mo old Cornish X's this weekend. Real hard crops, birds are weedy but otherwise very active. Raised in a metal bottom cage and left for death.

Besides getting them on the ground, what else do I need to do for them? Will they resume to normal having access to grit? Back off on feed? Massage?
 
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ValerieJ

Straw parade on snow day
Premium Feather Member
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Jul 24, 2016
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I rescued two 6 mo old Cornish X's this weekend. Real hard croups, birds are very thin and basically starving. Raised in a metal bottom cage and left for death.

Besides getting them on the ground, what else do I need to do for them? Will they resume to normal having access to grit?
What are you feeding them? They need a good healthy feed to regain their health. I recommend giving them nutridrench or electrolytes as well.
 

lovemelovemybirds

Songster
9 Years
Apr 28, 2010
102
11
146
Grand Junction
... Yes. Cornish are engineered to grow quickly and die anyway. This particular case as I understand it.. is the girl thought they were "cute" and bought them. Then they got big. She went to jail and the birds were left in a cage to die. Life is cruel indeed.
 
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FortCluck

Hatch-a-Long Queen
Sep 9, 2019
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... Yes. Cornish are engineered to grwo quickly and die anyway. This particular case as I understand it.. is the girl thought they wer "cute" and bought them. Then they got big. She went to jail and the birds were left in a cage to die. Life is cruel indeed.
I would start them off with some electrolytes in their waterer and some scrambled eggs. See how they do and then work them towards chicken feed again. Poor things have had a rough life, chickens don't belong in cages and this post has made me sad.
 

Ebony Rose

Crowing
12 Years
May 26, 2009
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David, Chiriquí, Panama
CORID® (amprolium) in their water now that they've got 'boots on the ground'. Since they've been caged up, it's unlikely that they've developed much resistance to coccidia. This treatment will not harm them or the environment in any way whatsoever, so prophylactically treating them for this awful, world-wide prolific and opportunistic parasite would be prudent. Pay very close attention to their weight gain and inspect their abdominal, under wing, and base of tail plumage for yeast, lice and mites, legs for sprains and breaks, and feet, both top and bottoms for sprains, breaks and bumblefoot. Make this inspection at least weekly as these rescues have already more than doubled their life expectancy. This type of bird typically spends their days laying on, in, or at least near their food and water so keeping things clean may be challenging. If they break a bone, you might consider processing them for the freezer before infection sets in, while their meat is still safe; expect that they'll be tougher than store-bought birds that were processed closer to 3 months of age. Soup is one option for tough birds, or age them in the fridge for up to a week before cooking. Blessings to you for rescuing them from a cruel and bitter end, locked in a cage without food or water in their foreseeable future.
 

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