Chicks w/bubble eye & swollen wattles

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by PioneerPrincess, Dec 7, 2009.

  1. PioneerPrincess

    PioneerPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Two of my chicks definetely have the same problem. One bird will be in bold letters; the other will not be. All help and advice are greatly appreciated.

    1) What type of bird , age and weight. Partridge Rock pullet four months, not sure on weight; Self Blue bantam cockeral about four months, not sure on weight.

    2) What is the behavior, exactly. She seems to have normal behavior; He seems to have normal behavior

    3) How long has the bird been exhibiting symptoms? It was first noticed on Saturday. She has swollen wattles, just below the comb, and can not close her beak ; It was noticed almost a week ago. One side has bubbly eye, and a swollen wattle. He has a lot of scabs if that were to be from pecking.

    4) Is there any bleeding, injury, broken bones or other sign of trauma. No, not that I know; No, not that I know.

    5) What happened, if anything that you know of, that may have caused the situation. Nothing that I know; Nothing that I know.

    6) What has the bird been eating and drinking, if at all. Yes, she has been eating & drinking readily; Yes, he eats & drinks like normal.

    7) How does the poop look? Normal? Bloody? Runny? etc. It looks normal (although it is liquidy because her food has been watered down, so that she may have an easier time swallowing); It is normal.

    8) What has been the treatment you have administered so far? I have put her in quarantine as soon as the problem was noticed. I syringe feed and water her and she has learned to swallow with her tongue. She is eating really good; I put him in quarantine today, once I saw our pullet had bubbly eyes.

    9 ) What is your intent as far as treatment? I want to treat completely myself; I want to treat completely myself.

    10) If you have a picture of the wound or condition, please post it. It may help.

    Partridge Rock pullet:
    [​IMG]

    Self blue Bantam cockeral:
    [​IMG]


    11) Describe the housing/bedding in use They were in the coop with our other chickens. The nesting boxes have alfalfa hay in them; They were in the coop with our other chickens. The nesting boxes have alfalfa hay in them


    I also have an EE who is always with them. He seems to have the scabby comb and wattles as the other cockeral. He is in the coop pen away from the others in case he has the same thing.

    EE:
    [​IMG]
    Thank you so much for your help!!!!
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2009
  2. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sounds like fowl pox:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/LC-diseases-AvianPox.html

    Just keep doing what you're doing, offering supportive care, and watch out for secondary bacterial infections (those you can treat with antibiotics). Fowl pox is a virus, and runs its course. It's not usually dangerous unless the bird gets the lesions in its throat, and interferes with its breathing or eating.
     
  3. PioneerPrincess

    PioneerPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Earlier this year at least three of my hens had fowl pox. They did not have bubbly eyes or swollen combs and wattles, so I think that the chicks might have something else going on too. Is it okay to eat the eggs of a hen who has had or has fowl pox? Are swollen wattles and bubbly eye a symptom also of fowl pox? Thank you for your help. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2009
  4. PioneerPrincess

    PioneerPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Does anyone else have any ideas as to what is going on?
     
  5. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It depends where the lesions are. Sometimes fowl pox can cause swelling and closure of one or both eyes:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=3247632

    You can eat the eggs of hens with fowl pox, it's not contagious to humans through the eggs or through direct contact with the lesions (whew, eh?). But hens with fowl pox often slow down or even stop laying during the course of their illness.

    One of my hens had an eye that looked filmy at the corner just like your Partrige Rock pullet; it cleared up in a day or two on its own. If it hadn't, I was going to give her Clavamox, a liquid antibiotic we got from our vet, because that looks like it could be a secondary bacterial infecton.
     
  6. PioneerPrincess

    PioneerPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you elmo for your replies. It is a relief to be able to eat the eggs of a chicken with fowl pox. Do you mean our chicks look like they have a secondary bacterial infection? Should they be given Clavamox since it still has not cleared? Also, do you know how much Clavamox costs? Thank you again!
    Do you think they might have Mycoplasma Gallisepticum or Coryza? If so, how do they get it? The chicks were purchased from a feed store and they are kept with the adult chickens if that might help. There are also lots of mosquitos where I live as I believe I read that MG can be transmitted from them. Thank you for your help! [​IMG]
     
  7. High Roost Ranch

    High Roost Ranch The Chicken Whisperer

    First thing that came to mind when I read your description with the SWOLLEN wattles was AI, Avian Influenza.

    Avian influenza viruses of low to moderate pathogenicity are identified regularly in the United States in the domestic poultry populations. Avian influenza virus is reintroduced into domestic poultry by migratory waterfowl, which are carriers of the influenza virus.

    Clinical signs vary greatly and depend on many factors including the age and species of poultry affected, husbandry practices, and the inherent pathogenicity of the influenza virus strain. Clinical signs may include:

    *ruffled feathers
    *soft-shelled eggs
    *depression and droopiness
    *sudden drop in egg production
    *loss of appetite
    *cyanosis (purplish-blue coloring) of wattles and comb
    *edema and swelling of head, eyelids, comb, wattles, and hocks
    *diarrhea
    *blood-tinged discharge from nostrils
    *incoordination, including loss of ability to walk and stand
    *pin-point hemorrhages (most easily seen on the feet and shanks)
    *respiratory distress
    *increased death losses in a flock

    However, I see lesions that are indicative of Fowl Pox. You likely have other issues happening in the respiratory category as the fowl pox stresses the immune system, opening them up for all kinds of other stuff that your flock may be harboring.

    It was told to me that black shoe polish applied directly to the lesions (of course not in an area with mucus membranes) greatly reduces the time line, and keeps it from spreading to others in the flock. The scabs flake off and pass it to others. The sneezing and body fluids also passes on whatever else might be happening. I personally have not tried the shoe polish trick because I've not had a bad outbreak here in several years. But, I would give everyone in your flock Tylan to treat the respiratory illness that is apparent. Isolate those who are symptomatic, treat those with a full dose and treat the others as a preventative.​
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2009
  8. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Gee, I have no idea about MG or coryza, or whether you're looking at any secondary infections. I know that when I took our little roo to the vet for his wet pox, he had a very bad odor coming out of his mouth that was caused by a secondary bacterial infection. The Clavamox cleared this up in a jiffy and now he's fine, back to his old self.

    Our vet charged $26 for the Clavamox, and it was a 10 day supply for one bird. I'm not sure if you can buy it over the counter, though. You might want to follow the other commenter's suggestion about Tylan.
     
  9. PioneerPrincess

    PioneerPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If it hadn't, I was going to give her Clavamox, a liquid antibiotic we got from our vet, because that looks like it could be a secondary bacterial infecton.

    I forgot to ask if you were saying if my chicks might have a secondary bacterial infection or in case your chicken did. Sorry about that. I have smelled around their faces and I don't smell any bad odors.
    Today, I swiped antibiotic ointment on their scabby and swollen areas in case they do have a bacterial infection. Thanks for your help. [​IMG]
     
  10. PioneerPrincess

    PioneerPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The little bantam roo is doing much better! His wattle and left side are down to the same size as the other side of his face. He also has brighter red comb and wattles. The scabs are starting to disappear and there is barely any bubbles in his eye. A couple of days ago he started crowing!!! [​IMG] He has such a cute little crow.
    The hen is not up to par yet; although, she does seem to be moving her beak more when trying to eat out of a bowl.
     

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