Choosing the Best Eggs

3KillerBs

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I've been trying to read up on this in hope of getting an incubator for Christmas or, at least, having a broody next spring.

After I've chosen the birds I want to breed for their desirable characteristics and after I've eliminated dirty, misshapen, defective, or otherwise generally wonky eggs* what are some things to look for in the best hatching eggs?

How heritable are traits like color, speckling, and level of bloom?

I see in several articles to choose "medium" eggs, neither small nor large.

But does that mean Medium as in 49-56 grams (US standard)? Which doesn't make much sense if you want to perpetuate a laying flock for egg sales when people want to buy Large (56-63g) and X-lg (64-70g).

Or does it mean average for the breed?

Or just "not undersized and not huge"?

Also, should all the eggs set in a single batch be roughly the same size? I've read that bantams might hatch earlier than large fowl, does that mean that the smaller eggs in a batch might hatch sooner than the larger ones?



*I have 2 hens that I definitely won't breed because one is prone to calcium deposits and another lays weirdly-round eggs.
 

The-White-Elephant

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Nov 3, 2021
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I've been trying to read up on this in hope of getting an incubator for Christmas or, at least, having a broody next spring.

After I've chosen the birds I want to breed for their desirable characteristics and after I've eliminated dirty, misshapen, defective, or otherwise generally wonky eggs* what are some things to look for in the best hatching eggs?

How heritable are traits like color, speckling, and level of bloom?

I see in several articles to choose "medium" eggs, neither small nor large.

But does that mean Medium as in 49-56 grams (US standard)? Which doesn't make much sense if you want to perpetuate a laying flock for egg sales when people want to buy Large (56-63g) and X-lg (64-70g).

Or does it mean average for the breed?

Or just "not undersized and not huge"?

Also, should all the eggs set in a single batch be roughly the same size? I've read that bantams might hatch earlier than large fowl, does that mean that the smaller eggs in a batch might hatch sooner than the larger ones?



*I have 2 hens that I definitely won't breed because one is prone to calcium deposits and another lays weirdly-round eggs.
To me, the smaller the egg, it might hatch faster, as it has more heat than a large one, but that is just what I think
 

JacinLarkwell

Crossing the Road
Mar 19, 2020
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South-Eastern Montana
I've been trying to read up on this in hope of getting an incubator for Christmas or, at least, having a broody next spring.

After I've chosen the birds I want to breed for their desirable characteristics and after I've eliminated dirty, misshapen, defective, or otherwise generally wonky eggs* what are some things to look for in the best hatching eggs?

How heritable are traits like color, speckling, and level of bloom?

I see in several articles to choose "medium" eggs, neither small nor large.

But does that mean Medium as in 49-56 grams (US standard)? Which doesn't make much sense if you want to perpetuate a laying flock for egg sales when people want to buy Large (56-63g) and X-lg (64-70g).

Or does it mean average for the breed?

Or just "not undersized and not huge"?

Also, should all the eggs set in a single batch be roughly the same size? I've read that bantams might hatch earlier than large fowl, does that mean that the smaller eggs in a batch might hatch sooner than the larger ones?



*I have 2 hens that I definitely won't breed because one is prone to calcium deposits and another lays weirdly-round eggs.
I assume medium is the normal egg that hen lays (not any weird larges or smalls that randomly pop out)
 

LadiesAndJane

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I don’t think size is so important as shape of the egg. You don’t want any with unusual shapes which may make it difficult for chicks to hatch. You want to make sure your pullets have been laying for at least a month before you incubate their eggs so they can work out any kinks in their system. I currently only incubate and hatch silkies from my flock and prefer to choose eggs that are over 40g. Though I did successfully hatch several pullet eggs that were in the low 30s this season.😊
I have also hatched standard and bantam eggs together in the past without problems. My silkies’ eggs to tend to hatch day 19 or 20 but this has not been a problem, I just pull the chicks out as they hatch.
Good luck!😀
 

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