Christmas Tree Roosts

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by LoneStarBantams, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. LoneStarBantams

    LoneStarBantams Chillin' With My Peeps

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    could you use Noble Firs and Frasier Firs as roosts
     
  2. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    I use cherry tree limbs in my coop. They have worked great. They still have bark on them.
     
  3. LoneStarBantams

    LoneStarBantams Chillin' With My Peeps

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    But what about christmas trees like noble and frasier firs
     
  4. Baymule

    Baymule Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't see why you couldn't try it. If it doesn't work, toss it out. If it does work, then you just recycled your Christmas tree!!
     
  5. LoneStarBantams

    LoneStarBantams Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have another question why do some people say dont use cedar shavings
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2012
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Have you ever smelled cedar after it has been confined?

    Did you know that many girls used to be given a cedar chest to keep things like linens they were saving for use once they got married? A smart young man might want to know something about the girl's "hope chest" before he proposed. That was an indication of how thrifty and industrious she was, similar to her wanting to know what his job prospects were. The cedar gives off a vapor that keeps the bugs out.

    Enough of showing my age.

    When the cedar is in a big chunk, like when a log or limb is used as a roost, and it is in a reasonably ventilated area, it's not a big deal. It does not give off enough vapor to cause the chicken any respiratory problems. If it is in a confined space and there is enough cedar, it might be a problem, but realistically, don't worry about it. A limb does not have enough surface area to give off enough harmful vapors to cause a problem.

    But if that same cedar is shaved into thousands of very thin shavings, you are creating a while lot of surface area to give off that vapor. Some brooders can be fairly confined spaces. It's possible that vapor could build up enough to cause problems. That's why people say don't use it. It's not that it will absolutely without a shadow of a doubt each and every time kill 100% of your chicks if you use it, but it can. It's a simple precaution to take to protect your chicks.
     
  7. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    Evergreens are, in general, sappy, soft wood so not the ideal roost. If you're spanning a short distance and you've got a thick trunk to work with, I'm sure it would work but if there are other options, I'd choose something a bit less sticky.
     
  8. LoneStarBantams

    LoneStarBantams Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ok
     

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