Chronic Mites..cull or cure?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by BluMottie, Jan 3, 2009.

  1. BluMottie

    BluMottie Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 3, 2009
    ...Rock. Seriously.
    Okay, one of my birds has had chronic mites since I recieved her. She's a little droopy, even when the ivomec kills off 98% of the buggers, and take her off the ivomec for more than a week and they're back, in full force. I've got 7-dust, and used it, which works, for some time, before the mites return. The mites never seems to travel to the other birds; they're untouched.

    Since my mom is a vet, we're going to try several other methods of removal, but what do you pest-battle-hardened poultry experts think I should do? Is there some exotic cure out there, or should I just...off her?

    Opinions GREATLY appreciated.
     
  2. panner123

    panner123 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 15, 2007
    Garden Valley, ca
    First off, you kill the mites on the chicken. What have you done for her next box and the coop? You will have mites until you get the whole coop area clean. Floor, ceiling, walls, nest boxes and every crack in the coop needs to be cleaned and dusted. I would use DE, it is safe for the chickens. If one of your chickens has mites, they all do. If you cull the chicken, you will still have mites.
     
  3. dixiechick

    dixiechick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:DE? Can you be more specific?....I am finding out the hard way that mites/lices are nothing to take lightly.
     
  4. tim_TX

    tim_TX Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 4, 2008
    I agree with panner123, if your chicken has a chronic problem with mites then your coop and all of the others are infested too. Mites can build up a resistance to some chemicals, so if what you are doing isn't working then try something new. Treat both birds and premises thoroughly and treat again in 10 days, and again, and again until they are gone. If you cull and bring in new birds they will soon have mites too.
     
  5. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits... Premium Member

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    Western MA
    dont kill the bird because of mites.....kill the MITES....silly!...[​IMG]...i am sure if mom is a vet..she knows this....treat the bird....TOTALLY clean out her coop/bedding... THEN spray the bug killer stuff in EVERY crack/creavice of the coop....and THEN do it ALL again in like a week...good luck to you![​IMG]
     
  6. tim_TX

    tim_TX Chillin' With My Peeps

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    DE is diatomaceous earth .... basically a sandy type substance with very sharp microscopic surfaces that irritate [ and can kill ] insects. It's really more of a preventative than a treatment though. Organic folks use it quite a bit although I remain a bit pessimistic about it actually ridding an active infestation.
     
  7. mudderhen

    mudderhen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 27, 2008
    Clarkesville, GA
    DE/ Diatomacious Earth, is not just a preventative, but it really does work. Do a search for mites or DE and there is some great information. Just make sure you use food grade DE and not any other type like that por pools. You will kill your birds. You need to dust the birds (all of them), the coop and their nest boxes. It seems like a big ordeal, but it really isn't.
    My birds had lice and mites bad and I dusted all the birds one night, them the next day, I cleaned most of the shavings out of the coop and dusted the coop and nest boxes well, and left it. I checked the birds every couple of days, and they were completely mite and louse free after a week and still are. It is great stuff, it's natural so the bugs don't become resistant to it, and all you need to do is wear a dust mask.
     
  8. Poohbear

    Poohbear On a Time Out

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    Nov 12, 2008
    Texas
    No such thing as Chonic mites. You are not cleaning and killing the mites in the coop and chicken area. Wood is especially suseptible to critters of ALL kind, mites included. Lots of fine ideas here already with the DE and all. This is what I would do. Remove aLL fowl from the area they are now in to pens that have been sprayed with bleach. The WHOLE area! Coops, nests ground and especially soak all the wood inside the coops or area where this particular bird is roosting. Buy some "Adams Flea and Tick" Spray from wal-mart, co-op or feedstore. Spray EACH chicken under the wings, over the butt, top of the tail and up and down the tail feathers. Mites like to get on the feather stems and eat blood from the feather.One spray under the neck feathers. Then wipe their legs liberally with Scarlett Oil from the feedstore. This will kill scalely legged mites. You can use regular Diesel Fuel on coops also but have to let the Diesel air out good before putting the fowl back in the coop. Don't spray Diesel on grass or trees. Diesel will kill grass and trees. Then come in with a sprayer of Permithrin and water (according to directions on Permethrin bottle). Spray the entire area, including the coops and nest with Permithrin. SOAK the walls and nest with it! If you detect any mites a couple weeks after this, Do it all again. Mites and worms will kill chickens if not treated!
     
  9. BluMottie

    BluMottie Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 3, 2009
    ...Rock. Seriously.
    Thanks to everyone who has replied!

    Okay, definantly making arrangements to purchase some heavy-duty mite killer.

    The birds are in a small section of a heated concrete barn. It might be a little bit hard to clean the ceiling, since it's ten feet high. But I'm sure a powerhose should do fine, right? The birds aren't loose, they were in their own dog crates, but are now in a large 9x5 wooden "box", if you will.

    Dumping out all of the old bedding way off in the woods.
     
  10. Poohbear

    Poohbear On a Time Out

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    Nov 12, 2008
    Texas
    A back-pack sprayer will reach 10 foot. If you can't then use a ladder. Need to kill ALL critters!
     

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