1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Cinder Block Heaters

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by little brown hen, Nov 21, 2009.

  1. little brown hen

    little brown hen Chillin' With My Peeps

    133
    1
    121
    Mar 29, 2009
    Camp Point, Ill
    Hi can someone post some pictures on how to make a heater out of cinder blocks for my metal water's? Thank You
     
  2. faykokoWV

    faykokoWV Mrs Fancy Plants

    3,476
    86
    258
    Nov 4, 2008
    Cross Lanes, WV
    I've never heard of that [​IMG]
     
  3. maine chicks

    maine chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    165
    1
    111
    Nov 10, 2008
    maine
    I don't have a picture but this is how I do it. Put two cinder blocks on their sides with holes facing you. Put a metal light that car mechanics use in the hole. I hook a piece of hard wire with the hook so the birds don't peck at the light. The wires come out the back and run along the wall to the outlet. I have a cookie sheet size piece of steel that I put on top so poop and water don't go between the blocks. I put my metal waterer on top and keep a 60 watt bulb ( not florescent-no heat) on all the time once the temps drop below freezing on a regular basis. My birds hang out by the blocks when it is really cold because they hold the heat. Do not use the plastic lights-they don't last as long and I think the metal one is a better heat conductor. I blow shavings and dust out of the holes a couple times a week. I have been using this for 6 years now. On really cold days ice does form in the waterer so I have two and switch them out morning and evening with very warm water. Don't use the plastic waterer for this-less heat conduction and when you have to wack the thing to get ice out plastic ones crack. Good luck.
     
  4. little brown hen

    little brown hen Chillin' With My Peeps

    133
    1
    121
    Mar 29, 2009
    Camp Point, Ill
    So Maine Chicks What you mean is put the light some how in the hole and it heats the top so I sit my water on it? Thank You
     
  5. maine chicks

    maine chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    165
    1
    111
    Nov 10, 2008
    maine
    I put the whole light that comes in a metal cage right through the holes in the cinder blocks. The light has a heavy duty cord on it that is long enough to go in my outlet. I have mine running behind the nest boxes so the birds can't get to the cord. If worried about the cord run it through a piece of conduit. People around here hang a couple of these lights under their house so their pipes don't freeze in the coldest of winter. You can put up to 100W bulb in them but I have never needed more than a 60W.
     
  6. thechickenchick

    thechickenchick Born city, Living country

    Mar 8, 2008
    Eaton, Colorado
    I love both of these ideas!! I have a stack of cinder blocks and a huge box of cookie tins.

    We use a different system though. This is just because we are cheap(thrifty?!) and asked our child's Bus Driver who also raises chickens what he does. He told us to take a wheel (from a car, no tire) place a bulb(we used a socket set up like the cookie tin idea) in the center of the wheel. Then hubby cut a round piece of steel to place over the top to keep water, shavings and poo out of it. A 40 watt bulb works great. Just another idea to use something you may already have around your place.
     
  7. little brown hen

    little brown hen Chillin' With My Peeps

    133
    1
    121
    Mar 29, 2009
    Camp Point, Ill
    Thank's To everyone's idea's will try some of these
     
  8. JanieMarie

    JanieMarie Chillin' With My Peeps

    701
    5
    141
    Aug 26, 2008
    Georgetown, Minnesota
    I've used this system in my oldest coop for 20+ yrs with no problems. I have a cinder block large enough so a brooder light set up fits snuggly into the center facing upward with just a light bulb in it. Then cut a piece of metal flashing to totally cover the top and I set the metal waterer directly on the flashing. Flashing keeps dust etc from entering and also keeps water from dripping down onto the bulb. I change the wattage of the bulb depending on how cold it is. The height of the cinder block keeps shavings out of the waterer too. Works great!! And the water doesn't freeze even when we have a week or so of -30* temps (air temp not windchill!) Man I'm not looking forward to that again!! [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by