Cleaning Crop

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Missy3b, Jan 19, 2010.

  1. Missy3b

    Missy3b Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 29, 2009
    Central Missouri
    What's the best way to help an impacted crop? I have tried massaging it but that doesn't help. Thanks.
     
  2. aveca

    aveca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 30, 2009
    Waverly, NY
    There was a book at farm and tractor a while ago on chicken medical issues , they had a good article about impacted crop. ,with sour crop they leaned tbird forward butt in the air nose toward the ground and softly massaged the crop and the goop that came out of there you couldnt beleive. But it was only for a very breif period, A VET visit might be in order if you are not sure you can do more harm than good if it doesnt resolve itself. I read where one person actually did serious damage trying this on very hard impacted crop. This is usually only done for Sour crop which is large soft and smells very bad. on occasion a vet actually has to cut open the crop to remove blockage.

    I think a long time ago people were closer to farming than today with everything under plastic wrap at grocery store so these skills were probably learned early on a long time ago. I personally have not had to do this, Ive had some full crops but only after a day of a little too much munching they resolve over night.

    Do you have enough grits avail? doesnt matter , if they get into rough weeds ect sometimes they need a little help. When in doubt consult your vet at least by phone. until then maybe some corn oil in dropper to help loosen it
     
  3. aveca

    aveca Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,706
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    228
    Jun 30, 2009
    Waverly, NY
    I say , when in doubt consult a vet, here is some advise on impacted crop but not on sour crop. I personally couldnt bring myself to use super glue I would let a vet do it but for interest of how some people treat this:

    Treating Impacted or Bound Crop in Chickens
    If you suspect your chicken has an impacted crop start treatment in the morning by dropping a small amount of olive oil or liquid paraffin (2-3ml) into the bird’s mouth and then gently massaging the crop to help break up the compaction and repeat this procedure in the afternoon.

    Feed a soft food such as layers mash and again add some natural yoghurt to soften the food and neutralise and bacterial build up in the crop.

    It may take a couple of days to break up the compaction, but if it persists for three days the compaction may need surgically removing. If you are not confident carrying this out yourself take the bird straight to the vets where they can perform the operation.

    In the event you wish to carry this out operation yourself you will need a scalpel, rubbing alcohol, cotton wool, clean towels, water, saline solution (at blood temperature), an additional pair of hands to hold the bird securely and superglue.

    Firstly wrap the chicken in a towel and hold securely. Next, locate the chicken’s crop and sterilise with the alcohol and then make an incision about half way down the crop of about 1cm using enough pressure to cut through the skin and the thin muscle area below.

    Once the incision is made quickly remove the contents of the crop and then rinse the crop with the saline solution. Put a thin line of superglue along the incision and hold the edges of the muscle and skin together so they seal. Superglue was actually invented as a method of treating injuries on the battlefield for the US Army.

    Clean the exterior area and again rub with the alcohol solution. Isolate the chicken in a clean secure coop and do not give any food or water for at least 18 hours. After this provide water and small amounts of liquefied food such as pureed fruit or mash.

    If you suspect infection go straight to the vet for further treatment. Always seek the advice of a vet if the condition worsens.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2010

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