Clear Carpet Protector??

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Chick named Lola, Oct 27, 2010.

  1. Chick named Lola

    Chick named Lola Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 15, 2010
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    I've seen someone mention using this to cover the mesh on their run for the winter...what do you attach it with? Also I've read to keep the bottom 6 inches open for ventilation but I've seen pics with the top 6 inches open...?? which is better? Wouldn't the bottom 6 get covered with snow? Thanks for your input!!
     
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Personally I've found the cheapest windproofing for your run fence to be 6 mil translucent plastic, like they sell for vapor barrier purposes. If you have only a small run and do not need the giant rolls they sell at Home Depot you should be able to find someone with leftovers from some project, or just find any other stout plastic to use. Stretch tight, and staplegun on through duct tape, or attach with battens. Use LOTS of staples or screws. If you find the plastic becoming baggy and flapping in the wind, install it tighter next year [​IMG] and for this year get some string or old baler twine or whatever, and crisscross that back and forth to bunge the plastic down tight; or tack some old scrap molding or used 2x4s over it in the same way, to discourage flapping.

    But before deciding to do this make sure your run fencing will not blow over due to the resultant wind load.

    In a similar but even more serious vein, DO NOT use plastic (or anything else solid) on the top of your run unless you are REALLY darn sure the supporting structure of your run is engineered to withstand the resulting snowload which can be quite considerable even from not very much snow. It can be quite a pain in the neck to try to repair a collapsed/ruined run, especially in the middle of winter.

    My preference is to leave one side, or half of one long side, of the run completely un-plasticked, for ventilation, rather than a gap all the way along. If you WERE leaving a gap all the way along, though, in principle I would suggest it be at the top rather than the bottom, so you do not have cold winds blowing right at the chickens which would discourage them from using the run on nasty days.

    JME, good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2010
  3. Cargo

    Cargo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 28, 2010
    Farmington, NM
    I ended up using 20 mil clear vinyl from the fabric store for my tractor. It is the same stuff they use for jeep windows. Tough and easy to see through.
    It is a bit expensive $5-6.00 / yard at 54" Wide. But I had a 40% off coupon for 1 item so it wasn't too bad.
    I sandwiched it between 2 battens and screwed every 4 inches on the top and put grommets in on the bottom so I can roll it up and bungie it down.
     
  4. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Good lord, at $5/yard I could afford to windblock maybe half of one of the four runs of mine that need to be winterized [​IMG] I bet it holds up well though, at least til UV damage sets in.

    Another thing, especially for people in REALLY windy areas where something solid on the run fence is likely to cause blowing-over, or for large runs where you don't need complete wind stoppage, is the burlap they sell for wrapping evergreen shrubs/trees in overwinter. It is like, I dunno, $11 for 3x25' or something on that order, around here, probably cheaper in the States. It is fairly open weave so a lot of wind goes thru but in a *gentle* way, so you get not too much wind load on the structure AND pretty reasonable windbreak effect. I tried it on my turkey run last winter and was quite amazed at how comfortable things were on the downwind side of it (and it gets REAL windy here). Mine has lasted for almost exactly one year now (left up), I have a feeling it is weak enough now that another winter would start ripping it down but will probably just put another layer on over the old stuff [​IMG]

    Pat
     
  5. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2009
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    I just winter proofed one of my small runs with the 6 mil plastic on three sides, leaving about 6-8 inches open at the top under the roof line. I covered the plastic up with some cheap reed rolled fencing. It looks better, and helps keep the plastic from flapping around, too.

    It's very cozy in there now....when the temperature starts to drop here, I'll be ready.
     
  6. Cargo

    Cargo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 28, 2010
    Farmington, NM
    Good lord, at $5/yard I could afford to windblock maybe half of one of the four runs of mine that need to be winterized tongue I bet it holds up well though, at least til UV damage sets in.

    Yes it is expensive but should last me for years since it is UV stabilized for use as windows in jeeps, tents, etc. Plus I only needed 3 yards for my small coop. [​IMG]
     

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