Club feet - why did it happen? Lots of pics

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Gallusfarm, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. Gallusfarm

    Gallusfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wondering why some of these have club foot.

    Here's what happened.

    For the set of chicks below, the eggs were incubated together.

    This batch is different in that a friend hatched in her incubator (so her daughter could see chicks hatch). I picked them up at 1 week. At the time, I didn't notice anything unsual about the feet. I've read that a cold brooder floor could be the problem. It was especially cold here during their 1st week in the brooder in our garage, but the air temp. was fine.

    I had a hatch before and after this with my incubator, same brood stock, no foot issues.


    1. Could it be from a cold brooder floor
    2. Issues during incubation - humidity maybe? She said she had a hard time keeping the hum. regulated.
    3. genetic problems. the Dominiques all have the same father - mother could be one of 3 hens. The RIR is from different parents, obviously.

    The fact that the RIR also has a bit of crookedness there, makes me wonder if it's environmental.

    Any thoughts would be appreciated.



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    #7 - the RIR
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  2. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    That's actually called Curled Toe Paralysis. It is often caused by a riboflavin deficiency, and sometimes by excessive inbreeding. I don't think there was much you could have done to prevent it. What is the diet and lifestyle of the parent hens? That can help narrow what caused it. Do you know the origins/bloodlines of the parents?

    You can indeed fix it though. Some people get little "boots" for them, often from cardboard, styrofoarm, ductape, etc. You basically bend the toes carefully back to where they should be and secure them there with materials.

    Your chicks however I think are getting a bit too old for that though. I've had an Easter Egger who had both feet with toes like some of your little fellas there and he ended up getting around pretty well. Even with some "training" I got him to be able to fly up and perch; He could even still mate with other hens, but it wasn't always successful.
     
  3. Gallusfarm

    Gallusfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you very much for the reply. It's good to have a name for it. There could very well be inbreeding issues. The good news is that now I have an idea as to why it happened.

    I'm relieved to know that it is not an enviromental issue. Hens eat Layena/free range and the chicks are raised on start and grow, so don't suspect vitamin def... Unless they have absorption issues.

    Thanks!
     
  4. Lavbo

    Lavbo New Egg

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    Quote:Hi, I'm writing from Denmark and one of my 3 days old chicken have the same problem. Does anyone have a picture of the a little boot?
     
  5. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Last edited: Feb 19, 2011
  6. Gypsy07

    Gypsy07 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    To the OP: I have two big old Marans with feet that are worse looking than those photos. They're about three or four years old, and I got them like that six months ago. They get about fine and it doesn't seem to bother them in any way. They roost up on the same perches as the rest of my birds too. So you might be too late to correct your chicks' feet, but it probably won't matter any to them...
     
  7. Lavbo

    Lavbo New Egg

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    I found a picture and made a "boot" last night. [​IMG]
    My sons chick Snowball is now walking around again like nothing has happend [​IMG] I will let it sit for 2-3 days and then try and take it of and see what happens.
     
  8. Gallusfarm

    Gallusfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for all of the information! Wanted to let you know that I tried cardboard and gauze/tape and it did help with the severity, however they will never be straight and normal.

    Have since hatched more chicks from the same parents. No toe problems. I really do belive that it was the incubation conditions. But I talked about it with the person who hatched them, and she said that the toes were straight at hatch. Weird that it happened a few weeks out. Maybe the brooder floor being chilly contributed? But even if they are chilled, they huddle together, you'd think they'd warm each others feet??? I dunno.

    Gypsy, good to know that your old Marans are fine.
     
  9. xke4

    xke4 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:No picture to add but a description.
    Take a Bandaid. Cut the sticky ends off. (Those are the pieces you will use). Place one sticky, sticky side up on a flat surface. Place the affected foot with toes in the correct anatomical position on top. Place other sticky, sticky side down, on top of the foot. (Bandaid foot sandwich). Leave for a least 24 hours on newly hatched chick. Probably longer for slightly older (don't know how effective this is.....have always addressed the problem immediately). I have had 100% positive outcome with every bird. Good Luck!
     
  10. Lavbo

    Lavbo New Egg

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    Is there anyone who knows how long it takes before one can see an improvement if we start to give vitamins simultaneously?

    (Excuse for my English I have to use google translate once in a while [​IMG] )
     

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