Cocci long term treatment suggestions?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Larkspur88, Aug 31, 2011.

  1. Larkspur88

    Larkspur88 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've had issues with cocci in my flock for months. They can go a month acting fine then after a rainy spell or when I add a new bird the new bird will suffer and die. I've been off and on treating the water five days or more in a row then skipping five and retreating. But I think I have such an infestation I need something more long term. Would a medicated feed be suitable to add along too? Do they medicate layer feed that I can buy at my TSC?

    I feel bad because I am in the works to start breeding seramas but any buyer will have a big footnote to their purchase: treat this bird for cocci before adding to your flock!!!

    And this morning a pheasant was really wobbly and weak. It always seems to make them weak and lethargic and then they lay down and pass on eventually. When I take stools in to be looked at the ones who end up passing or seem sick are always heavily infested.

    All I can say is ARGH.
     
  2. chicmom

    chicmom Dances with Chickens

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    Are you using Corid to treat your cocci? That is very effective, and more gentle on their systems than Sulmet. Also, do you have sand in your chicken runs? When I had trouble with cocci, I had a dirt run, then my husband brought in a nice truckload of sand to put in the chicken runs. Everything has been fine since.

    Usually, chickens over 17 weeks of age have built up their own natural immunities to cocci, and I'm wondering if you're just talking about very young birds. I don't know anything about gamebirds, so I can't help there.

    Good luck to you, and take care,
    Sharon
     
  3. Larkspur88

    Larkspur88 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Seems that my birds who are over 4 months are fine. It's chicks, younger birds, and younger birds I add that have not been exposed to the parasite. I had a sultan die and she was a new bird around 5 months the oldest. Had her about 2 weeks only and she had poo caked on her and was having runny stools after being in the coop. Was healthy before. The pheasant acting sick this morning is young. Maybe 3 months or a little older?

    Corid is what I have been using. And I probably even overdose when I treat too.
     
  4. WhiteMountainsRanch

    WhiteMountainsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Younger than 5 months weeks in your situation I would DEFINITELY be using medicated feed, but as the poster above me said they should develop a natural immunity to it as they age. If they aren't I would question whether or not it really is Cocci.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2011
  5. Larkspur88

    Larkspur88 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well the older birds are fine. It's normally chicks and young birds so I am pretty confident in the cocci. When it originally occurred I had a flock of 6 week old Easter Eggers pooping blood like parvo puppies all over my porch (this was before my coop was built) and they were lethargic and laying around. Treated them and they recovered and were back on their feet a few days later but for one bird I lost.

    So I am fairly familiar with the signs. I've also narrowed it down to exact strain of cocci. I work for a vet, but unfortunately he doesn't know much about birds. We treat cats and dogs.

    I think I will definitely switch to medicated feed and I might do a clean up in the coop today. It is just a never-ending battle
     
  6. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    I have had an issue this year with it. I think my geese are carrying it.

    I would suggest setting up a pen to introduce the birds to the outside soil and if they appear ill after a couple days, treat with corid. The amount of amprolium in medicated feeds just won't cut it.

    The cocci my farm has will affect the older birds too, so I have to keep an eye out should I wash the new sod down around the runs, it forces the poo into the breeding pens when the water drips in.
     
  7. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Warm humid soil is a place the parasite eggs can sit and wait for many many months... your new or young birds do not have an immunity to the ones you have in your soil. Giving medicated feeds will do nothing if you do not expose them as young chicks. To help them build immunity, I would do the medicated feed thing, give the babies a tiny bit of "contaminated" soil to play in so they can build immunity with help of medicated feeds, and then perhaps find a way to keep your run drier. Dry soil reduces the effective lifespan of the cocci oocysts.

    One thing to note, is that birds may always have a tiny bit in them, but if they are ingesting a lot from their environment, and get stressed by any other reason, a weakened immune system can let the protozoa take over.
     
  8. Larkspur88

    Larkspur88 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I might need to move to another state...

    It's humid. It's wet. Haha.

    My coop turns to mush after each storm. I don't have any grass to help dry it or anything. It's been a rough year. Thanks for the advice everyone. It makes me feel better when I hear other peep have the same issue. I swear they have good living quarters! Lol! I just know the dang parasite is living in the dirt laughing evilly as a chicken approaches.

    I will keep them on medicated feed and still treat in water as I see needed. I mean...they've been that infested. You should see the slides under the microscope. Makes you think twice about keeping chickens in your backyard.
     
  9. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Another thing to try too, is to switch meds. Just like bacteria, the protozoa can become resistant to meds. Some areas are just prime holding grounds for cocci, so all you can do is try and manage.
     
  10. chicmom

    chicmom Dances with Chickens

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    Seriously though, get a load of sand into your run if you don't already have it. It will help.

    Take care!
     

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