Coccidia, again. Now what?!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by FarmerJ8909, Dec 31, 2017.

  1. FarmerJ8909

    FarmerJ8909 In the Brooder

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    Nov 19, 2016
    I am hoping to get some insight into the best way to disinfect not only the coop ( a large 6.8 dutch style coop), but also the ground in the roughly 900 sqft run.

    I've been struggling with what we believe is coccidiosis since the summer - I've lost 4 birds since August - 2 this week. Here is what I've tried already:

    1) I've treated multiple times with Corid
    2) I've had one of the birds sent off for a necropsy to confirm since they were not presenting with the "typical" blood in stool. Result was 2 strains of coccidia resulting in a secondary necrotic enteritis.
    3) We've had a hard time keeping our run dry with all the wet weather we had all summer, so we raked off the top layer of soil and added about a foot of wood chips over the whole area.
    4) Cleaned out coop replaced with fresh bedding and completely replaced the roosting bars.
    5) I clean all the poop out of the coop every morning with a dog pooper scooper and dispose of it

    Lost my 2 Black Copper Marans this week, after treating with both Corid, and tetracycline for secondary infections. Based on the incubation period of coccidia and the fact that I've been struggling with this for months leads me to believe that there is a secondary point of infection that I am missing. If someone can recommend the best way to disinfect the coop and run area (including the soil) it would be very much appreciated.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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    You really cannot disinfect the soil. Coccidia is in the soil, in the poop, and enteritis which can follow coccidiosis, is also in the soil everywhere. It used to be thought that Corid (amprollium) would treat all 9 or more strains of chicken coccidia, but some may be resistant. It might be good to get a fecal float done to confirm coccidiosis, and get some sulfa antibiotic from a vet. Some brands are Sulfadimethoxine, Dimethox, and Albon. I think Sulmet is no longer available.

    As for enteritis, many birds who first suffer from coccidiosis, may go on to get enteritis from clostrium perfringens. That can be treated by several antibiotics, including amoxicillin, Tylan, and others. I would involve your vet if possible, since sulfa and other antibiotics are hard to get without a prescription. Without lab work, you may spend a lot of money on wrong medicines. There also could be something else going on with immunity. Giving probiotics daily for a while, then twice a week may be good. A good plain yogurt in small amounts contains probiotic in cultures.

    Keeping your coop dry by stirring the pine shavings, and adding new ones often is best. You may need to redirect water that is flowing into your run. Sorry about your losses.
     
  3. FarmerJ8909

    FarmerJ8909 In the Brooder

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    Nov 19, 2016
    Thank you for your response. On top of all of that we just got hit yesterday with over a foot of snow and the ladies are NOT happy, lol. Thank you again for your feedback. If you think Tylan will be helpful I can get my hands on that - I want to treat the whole flock, so do you think the soluble version works well enough? Or do the injectable form only, and treat each of them? By dumb luck (or ill fortune, rather) we currently have a fresh supply of amoxicillin from both my kids getting ear infections - what would the dosage be on that? 1.5-2ccs?

    *Oh, and just to clarify - the lists of meds for coccidia and enteritis are different, so would I get both and treat simultaneously? Just trying to come up with a plan of attack...and what about the coop itself? any disinfecting recommendations?
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    For NE
    The amoxicillin dose for chickens is really high, so you probably don't have enough for your birds. Dose is ~57 mg per pound twice a day for 7-10 days.

    If you can get Tylan Soluble Powder that would be great, but you have to find a way to make sure they get enough to drink. They need to get 50 mg tylosin per pound per day, so if they aren't drinking enough that might be tricky.

    You can use Tylan 50 or Tylan 200 orally, but it has to be given no less than twice a day, and 4 times per day would be best. If you decide to go this route, let me know and I'll calculate your dose.

    For coccidia
    You could try both Corid and the sulfa again, but this time give it orally. Or you could try Baycox. Let me know if you want to try Baycox and I will point you to some sites that sell it.
     
    Eggcessive likes this.
  5. FarmerJ8909

    FarmerJ8909 In the Brooder

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    Nov 19, 2016
    Thanks - since I want to treat the whole flock, I'm thinking the soluble powder - if I need to make the ones who aren't drinking consume enough tylosin - how much and how many times per day should I syringe feed since it is not going to be as concentrated?

    Or can the tylan 50 or 200 be added to the main waterer as well?
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Treating with Tylan is tricky because it's metabolized so quickly, so no less than twice a day if you're going to give it orally. Let me know the weights of your birds and I'll come up with a plan for you.
     
  7. FarmerJ8909

    FarmerJ8909 In the Brooder

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    Nov 19, 2016
    I don't know the exact weights of the birds unfortunately, but currently I have 1 partridge cochin and 1 salmon faverolle that are exhibiting symptoms. sorry so indecisive but I'm trying to figure out which is best, and which I can get my hands on the quickest - the powder or the liquid.
    Ok, so my Farm vet was able to drop off what he had in hand. He only had the powder on hand so let's work with that...
    I'm thinking out in waterer and syringe solution to the sickies....
    Dosage advise?
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Can you go buy a kitchen scale and weigh them?
     

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