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Coccidia... anyone else having problems?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by wjallen05, Sep 18, 2009.

  1. wjallen05

    wjallen05 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just had my second hen die from Cocci yesterday. The other one was last month, and I also had a young pullet die last month as well. I noticed most of my flock had signs of it, I treated everyone with Sulmet, and everyone got better except the two last month. Then a few days ago one of my RIR girls randomly got sick. It was coccidia for sure. I put her in a separate pin and put Sulmet in her water but she died anyway. It has been a VERY VERY wet and rainy summer for us. Their pens stay wet most of the time. What do I do???? I read that there are SEVEN (is this number correct?) different strands of coccidia for chickens. I am so worried about the rest of them now. Though, everyone else is completely fine for now, she was the only one acting sick.

    We are currently building a new coop and run for the whole flock. I am considering putting gutters around the coop and trenches around the run.
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    There are 9 strains. I'd go with Corid next time. Wet conditions just make cocci worse, but I have never had an adult get it, only chicks 4-10 weeks old. Sulmet did not work for me and does not work for eimeria tenella (I think that's the type), one of the 9 strains, which is why Sulmet did not work for me here. Sulmet is also hard on their gut, being a sulpha drug. Corid and probiotics (plain yogurt) are what I'd be using. Every group of chicks here gets cocci, no matter what, since its in the soil; even medicated feed does not help. Keep the waterers and feeders clean since ingesting feces of other birds can keep the cycle going, but it's a curse, I know.
     
  3. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    What makes you so certain it was Coccidiosis? I have never known Cocci to affect grown birds or for it to affect a bird that had previously been infected & treated.
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Are you sure it's not a bad case of worms?
     
  5. wjallen05

    wjallen05 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    you know, I have no idea. It could be worms?
    (thank you btw, Cynthia, for the info!)

    Here were the symptoms of both hens. Tell me what you think.

    wilted comb
    off-balance
    weak
    off feed
    thirsty
    bad diarrhea (really, really bad)

    The other "sick" chickens had runny poops which cleared up after Sulmet treatment.


    I bought some DE and have given it to the flock some, should I give it every day? How much? Free choice? Also I just read about Apple Cider Vinegar.. how often should I give that?

    Thanks in advance!!!
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2009
  6. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    Coccidiosis causes lesions in the gut which in turn cause bloody stools. Definate diagnosis in a live bird is possible with a fecal exam but don't wait too long as Cocci progresses rapidly. In a dead bird simply open the abdomen & check for lesions.
    I don't think your birds had Cocci. Sounds more like a severe worm infestation-also easily confirmed with a post mortem exam.
    I can't advise you about DE or vinegar as I believe the notion that either of them will prevent or treat anything is nonsence.
     
  7. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    see the 'fixing a muddy run' page in my .sig below for strategies for drying out the run... cocci or no, mud is not good for their health.

    Good luck,

    Pat
     
  8. wjallen05

    wjallen05 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    so what do I use for chicken wormer? Is preventative treatment good or bad?
     
  9. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Since Safeguard (panacur, fenbendazole, etc) is an anti-protozoan (the oocycsts that cause cocci are protozoans) in addition to being a wormer, I'd start with that. It can cause feather deformities in molting birds, but at this point, that probably isn't your main concern. I use the paste that comes in a tube for horses. Squeeze out a BB sized portion and open the beak and swipe it off into the mouth. Do them all, dont eat the eggs for at least two weeks afterward, but then, you'll have to re-treat at that point to get any worm eggs in their bodies that may have hatched since then.

    NYReds is right, that DE and ACV do not cure anything, but the ACV and milk products are for changing the pH in the gut to make a hostile environment for cocci.
     
  10. Bluemoon420

    Bluemoon420 The Rooster Queen

    I've used Panacur ( fenbendazole 10 %) It covers a wide range of worms, and can be found at most feed stores. It's an equine dewormer, and comes in a paste form. You only need a SMALL pea size amount ( less than that if it's a bantam) to treat one chicken. You will have to withhold any eggs for 2 weeks after worming. This was advised by our vet.

    ACV, or DE won't really work if they already have worms. It's supposed to be used as a preventative, not a treatment. I don't really know if DE prevents worms, but it does work well in the coop for keeping flies down.

    Bluemoon
     

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